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Skrevet av Emne: Vw facts  (Lest 58440 ganger)
Endre S
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« på: desember 01, 2012, 16:14:51 pm »

Eg begynte for nogen år siden, eg hadde vel lite å finne på då, men eg fant nogen kule fakta på thesamba.
Fant de igjen her en kveld å tenkte at dette vil vel nogen andre og kanskje synes er litt kjekt å lese når vinteren krybe mot oss.
Her er det litt.....

VW Fact #1: In 1931, Porsche himself developed the Volksauto image on paper, designating it "Project 12".

 VW Fact #2: Bus production by the end of 1950 was 60 per day.

 VW Fact #3: In 1951 12,003 buses were produced and exported to 29 countries.

 VW Fact #4: Bus production began on March 8, 1950.

 VW Fact #5: On October 9, 1954, the 100,000th Bus was made.
 
 VW Fact #6: During 1954, average Bus production was 80/day.
 
VW Fact #7: On March 8, 1956 the new Hanover plant began production of all VW Commercial vehicles.
 
VW Fact #8: By September 13, 1956, 200,000 VW Commercial vehicles had been made.
 
VW Fact #9: By September, 1959 500,000 VW Commercial vehicles had been produced.
 
VW Fact #10: On October 2, 1962 the 1,000,000 the Bus was made. A celebration ensued.

 VW Fact #11: On September 3, 1967 the era of the early Bus ended with the introduction of the new body styles.
 
VW Fact #12: In 1953, VW Commercial vehicle production accounted for 40.9% of German light commercial vehicles.
 
VW Fact #13: On March 1, 1955 a new factory, expressly built for the production of VW Commercials, begins construction in Stocken, a suburb of Hannover.
 
VW Fact #14: During 1954, 299 Buses were sold in Australia.
 
VW Fact #15: In 1960, all Buses were upgraded to a 40hp engine and a full synchromesh transmission.
 
VW Fact #16: There were 1,059 different models available in 1960 of both Bug and Bus due to the number of options.
 
VW Fact #17: In 1950, the loading area of a Panelvan Bus was 162 cubic feet, 5.5 feet wide by 13.5 feet long by 6.5 feet high. This was increased in 1955 to 170 cubic feet when the spare tire was moved to behind the rear seat.
 
VW Fact #18: In November, 1949 the first production VW Transporter was produced.
 
VW Fact #19: In 1950, the VW Transporter had a payload of 1830 lbs., could cruise at 50 mph, and could accelerate from 0-30 mph in 9 seconds for an estimated fuel rating of 25 miles per gallon.
 
VW Fact #20: In March, 1955, the era of the Barndoor ended when the spare tire was moved and an opening rear hatch added

VW Fact #21: From 1949-1955, VW Transporter production was located at the Wolfsburg factory. In 1956, production began at a new Transporter-only plant near Hanover, Germany.
 
VW Fact #22: At the opening of the VW Transporter Hanover plant in 1956, it employed 23,000 people.
 
VW Fact #23: The VW Transporter plant in Hanover was built on a 1 million square meter tract of land in 9 months.
 
VW Fact #24: In 1961, VW Trucks accounted for 42% of the German Truck market.
 
VW Fact #25: The VW Transporter plant in Hanover was constructed using 2.5 million sacks of cement, 8.5 million concrete blocks, 400,000 square meters of tarpaper. 256,000 truckloads of dirt were removed during the construction.
 
VW Fact #26: In 1956, 5,000 workers built 250 VW Commercials per day. Each Transporter was built to the specific orders of a VW dealer.
 
VW Fact #27: In 1952, the VW Single Cab was introduced with a 5 foot by 8.5 foot bed that could carry 1764 lbs.
 
VW Fact #28: The VW Single Cab locker is approximately 4 feet long by 5 feet wide, with a total volume of 23 cubic feet.
 
VW Fact #29: In 1962, a VW Single Cab could be bought for $1,885 on the East coast of the USA or $1,995 on the West coast.
 
VW Fact #30: The VW Bus contains 13,000 welds in its unitary construction.
 
VW Fact #31: In 1950, a VW Bus cost 2 cents per mile to run.

 VW Fact #32: On November 20, 1948 the first blueprints for the VW Transporter were drawn up.

VW Fact #33: On February 7, 1949, a 1/3 2/3 split seat was proposed for the VW Transporter but was not implemented until the late 1962 models.
 
VW Fact #34: On April 5, 1949, Testing of the VW Transporter prototypes ended
 
VW Fact #35: In 1950, the VW Bus was produced with a 1131cc engine. Top speed - 50mph/80kph, 25hp @ 3300rpm
 
VW Fact #36: On May 19, 1949, Heinz Nordhoff announced production would begin on the VW Transporter on Nov. 1 or during 12/1949 at the latest

VW Fact #37: On November 12, 1949, a Press Conference was held to present the 1st Transporter by Heinz Nordhoff.
 
VW Fact #38: In May, 1959, the 1200cc, 40hp engine was introduced.
 
VW Fact #39: From 1950-1962, Heater "Boxes" were used to heat the VW Transporter cabin. This consisted of passing the air that had cooled the engine directly into the cabin area

 VW Fact #40: In December 1962, Heat "exchangers" were introduced. Air was heated for use in the cabin by passing air over heated compartments instead of directly passing air that has cooled the engine into the passenger compartment
 
VW Fact #41: A stock Bus Transmission is so over engineered, it can handle up to 150hp!
 
VW Fact #42: In May, 1959, the Bus split case transmission was sunset in favor of a one-piece transmission casing.
 
VW Fact #43: The two-piece "splitcase" transmission was used until May of 1959 in the VW Bus.

 VW Fact #44: The two-piece "splitcase" transmission was used through the 1960 model year for Beetles.
 
VW Fact #45: Single circuit brakes were used on Buses from 1950 through 1966.
 
VW Fact #47: In March, 1950, Transporter sales began for the Panelvan only.
 
VW Fact #48: The Kombi was introduced to the market in May of 1950.

 VW Fact #49: The Microbus was introduced to the market in June, 1950, with a choice of either eight or nine seats.
 
VW Fact #50: "Barndoor" Busses were manufactured and sold between 1950 and the beginning of March, 1955.

 VW Fact #51: "Barndoor" Busses have no "fresh air eyebrow" or overhead air vent.
 
VW Fact #52: The Samba, with nine-person seating and a canvas sunroof, was introduced in April of 1951.

 VW Fact #53: The first Pick-up was launched in September of 1952.
 
VW Fact #54: In 1955, Volkswagen added a new opening rear hatch to the Bus and moved the gas-tank location to mimic the Truck.
 
VW Fact #55: In 1952, Volkswagen added Syncromesh to gears two through four of the Bus.

 VW Fact #56: During the years 1950-1953, the VW Transporter was produced with a 1131cc, 25hp engine with 5.8:1 compression.
 
VW Fact #57: In 1954, the VW Transporter was produced with a 1192cc, 36hp @ 3400 rpm engine with 6.6:1 compression.

VW Fact #58: In 1954, production of right-hand drive (RHD) models began in order to cater to a British market.
 
VW Fact #59: 1955 - Complete line of VW Transporters get a full-width dash, instead of just the Deluxe Microbus (Samba).
 
VW Fact #60: In 1955, VW Transporter rims were reduced from 16 inches to 15 inches in diameter.

 VW Fact #61: Production of VW Transporters in 1958 introduced bigger bumpers, including overriders for the American market.
 
VW Fact #62: In mid-1957, the center-mounted stoplight was discontinued and integrated into the taillights.
 
VW Fact #63: The Volkswagen Crew Cab was launched in 1958.

VW Fact #64: Initial gates for 1958 Crew Cabs were made from cutting Single Cab gates in half and rewelding them together minus a small section. This was done until production of Double Cab gates could be started.
 
VW Fact #65: Beginning with chassis number 469-506, a 40hp, 1192cc engine was used in the Volkswagen Transporter.
 
VW Fact #66: Until May, 1959, the generator pedestal for the Transporter engine was cast into the split case.
 
VW Fact #67: From 1950-1960, 678,000 Transporters were produced.
 
VW Fact #68: In August, 1961, the 1,000,000th Volkswagen Transporter was produced.
 
VW Fact #69: In 1960, Semaphores were discontinued in favor of the "bullet" turn signals (in European markets).
 
VW Fact #70: Transporter rear turn signal lenses were enlarged for the USA market, beginning in 1962.
 
VW Fact #71: In 1962, "bullet" front turn signals were discontinued in favor of larger, flatter turn signals.

VW Fact #72: The High Roof model was introduced in 1962, with a 6 cubic meter loading area.
 
VW Fact #73: In 1963 (1964 models), push button door handles were introduced for the VW Bus.
 
VW Fact #74: In August, 1963, the rear hatch and window were enlarged on the Transporter line.
 
VW Fact #75: Beginning in May, 1963, the Transporter could be ordered with a sliding door.
 
VW Fact #76: 1964 Bus hubcaps did not have the VW symbol painted a contrasting color. (Allegedly to save paint)
 
VW Fact #77: In 1963, buyers could opt for a 1500cc engine with 42hp and a 65mph maximum speed.
 
VW Fact #78: Starting in 1965, buyers could only get a 1500cc engine with their new Bus.
 
VW Fact #79: In 1964, the T-handle for the Bus rear hatch was changed to a push button.
 
VW Fact #80: In August, 1966, the Volkswagen Transporter line became 12 volt.

VW Fact #81: In July, 1967, the last first-generation split window Bus was made for a total of 1.8 million Buses.
 
VW Fact #82: In 1951, the first Westfalia Campmobile was created.
 
VW Fact #83: In 1959, the 1,000th Westfalia Transporter Camper Conversion was built.
 
VW Fact #84: By 1969, 50,000 Westfalia Campmobiles had been made.

 VW Fact #85: In November, 1950, the Ambulance Transporter model was introduced.
 
VW Fact #86: In 1950, the maximum speed for a Transporter was 48 mph.

VW Fact #87: In 1955, the Transporter fuel filler location was moved to outside the engine compartment for full-size Buses.
 
VW Fact #88: From 1950-1960, 678,000 Transporters were made - 243,000 Panelvans, 152,000 Kombis, 148,000 Standard and Deluxe Buses, 129,000 Pickups, and 6,000 special models
 
VW Fact #89: From 1954-1967, a Bus could be ordered with a Eberspacher heater as an option.

VW Fact #90: In 1967, the High roof Bus was manufactured with a synthetic roof lining.
 
VW Fact #91: The Ambulance model had a recommended tire pressure of 26 lbs./square inch, different from the normal Transporter line, which had recommended tire pressure of 28 lbs./square inch in the front and 33 lbs./square inch in the rear.

 VW Fact #92: The turning circle of an early VW Bus is 12 meters/39 feet.
 
VW Fact #93: The maximum speed of an early Pick-up with its tarpaulin installed is 53 mph.
 
VW Fact #94: In 1956, a Kombi could be bought for $2195.

 VW Fact #95: In 1956, a Microbus could be bought for $2365.
 
VW Fact #96: In 1956, a Deluxe Microbus could be bought for a little over $2365.
 
VW Fact #97: In 1956, a Kombi could be bought for $2150.
 
VW Fact #98: A 1960 Double Cab could be bought for $2330.

 VW Fact #99: A 1959 Microbus cost $2127.

 VW Fact #100: A 1961 Kombi cost $2245.

 VW Fact #101: A 1961 Microbus cost $2674

 VW Fact #102: A 1962 Deluxe Microbus cost L1,185

VW Fact #103: The VW Bus was known as a type 29 during its experimental stages.
 
VW Fact #104: In 1963, a Panelvan could be bought for $1895, or $1995 with a 1500cc engine.
 
VW Fact #105: In 1963, a Pickup could be bought for $1885, or $1995 with a 1500cc engine.

 VW Fact #106: In 1963, a Double Cab could be bought for $2175, or $2285 with a 1500cc engine.
 
VW Fact #107: In 1963, a Kombi could be bought for $2095, or $2195 with a 1500cc engine.
 
VW Fact #108: In 1963, a Kombi with Sunroof could be bought for $2220, or $2320 with a 1500cc engine.

VW Fact #109: In 1963, a Microbus could be bought for $2275, or $2385 with a 1500cc engine.

VW Fact #110: In 1963, a Microbus with Sunroof could be bought for $2399, or $2509 with a 1500cc engine.
 
VW Fact #111: In 1963, a Deluxe Microbus could be bought for $2655, or $2765 with a 1500cc engine.
 
VW Fact #112: Notchback sales began in 1961.

VW Fact #113: Squareback sales began in 1962.
 
VW Fact #114: Fastback sales began in 1966.
 
VW Fact #115: The Notchback was never legitimately sold in the United States.
 
VW Fact #116: The 1500S Type 3 model came with dual carburetors.

VW Fact #117: Early Type 3s came with a single carburetor.
 
VW Fact #118: The Squareback was also produced in a Panel-sided configuration for special usage.
 
VW Fact #119: In September, 1961, the public got to see and touch the all new VW-1500 at the Frankfurt Automobile Show.
 
VW Fact #120: While only six inches longer and less than three inches wider than the bug, the 1500 offered substantially more conventional features.

 VW Fact #121: The 1500 model was designed to allow loyal VW buyers to "trade-up" in the prosperous 1960's.
 
VW Fact #122: By summer, 1963, about 800 of the new 1500 models were being produced each day, compared with over 3,600 of the 1200 series, along with 800 transporters.

VW Fact #123: After four years of testing and refinement in other countries, the Type 3 became official at U.S. dealers in October 1965.

 VW Fact #124: In August of 1962, Volkswagen labor unions agreed to work Saturdays, consequently, larger markets could be opened for the 1500.
 
VW Fact #125: The number of Volkswagen authorized dealers in the U.S. exceeded 1,025 in 1966.
 
 VW Fact #126: VW registrations climbed toward a record of 375,000 units for 1965 alone, 10% ahead of 1964 figures.

VW Fact #127: Modifications to the Type 1 that resulted in the Type 3: the new fan was splined directly onto the crankshaft and the dynamo and the oil-cooler were moved, allowing for a second luggage compartment.
 
VW Fact #128: Benefits of the Type III: better visibility, more space for people and objects, improved comfort, better roadhandling, reduced oversteer, less sensitivity to cross-winds, and more power
 
VW Fact #129: The 1500 was competitively priced, being just 20% more expensive than the 1200.

 VW Fact #130: The Type III was originally researched in the 1950's, so by the time it was launched it already appeared dated.
 
VW Fact #131: The proposed 1500 Notchback Cabriolet was not produced due to the production costs involved, which would have resulted in a sales price that was too high for the marketplace at the time.
 
VW Fact #132: After the 1500's first year on the market, only 4% of customers had not complained for some reason or another.
 
VW Fact #133: In 1963, the 1500 S was introduced; equipped with twin carbs, it developed 54 hp at just 4200 revs.
 
VW Fact #134: A four-door Variant was proposed in 1960, but by the time it was ready to go into production in 1966, it was too late to help the waning Type III cause.
 
VW Fact #135: In 1965 a new model with "fastback" styling and a 1600, 54 hp engine was introduced.
 
VW Fact #136: Volkswagen had kept the 1500 off the American market for four years so Bug sales would not be affected.

 VW Fact #137: Ten thousand 1500s were smuggled into the U.S. via Canada, forcing many American dealers to stock spare parts for a model not officially sold yet.
 
VW Fact #138: From late 1967, the Type III could be equipped on request with fuel-injection and an automatic three-speed gearbox.

 VW Fact #139: There are five models in the early 1500 class: the Sedan, the Variant, their two respective S versions, and the Karmann Ghia coupe

VW Fact #140: The 1500 has an air-cooled, rear mounted, flat-four cylinder engine, independent torsion bar suspension on both axles, and an extended frame with central tunnel.
 
VW Fact #141: The 1500 "S" versions, also available in two-tone finish, have deluxe chrome trim.
 
VW Fact #142: All Variant models were available with optional heavy duty suspension, increasing the payload from 826 lbs. to 1014 lbs.
 
VW Fact #143: With the rear seat down, the Variant has 49 cu. ft. of luggage space.

VW Fact #144: During the 1960's, VW expanded its advertising from moderate use of only magazines to include radio, tv, billboards, and newspapers; the budget went from $1.2 million to over $20 million.

 VW Fact #145: Volkswagen new car registrations rose from 191,372 in 1960 to 567,975 in 1968.
 
VW Fact #146: 1959 and earlier Double Cabs were produced by Binz and were manufactured from converted Single Cabs.

VW Fact #147: 1958 Binz Double Cabs have a suicide rear door.

 VW Fact #148: 1959 and earlier Binz Double Cabs have unique gates, shortened at the front-most panel.
 
VW Fact #149: 1959 and earlier Binz Double Cabs have a unique rear seat.
 
 VW Fact #150: 1959 and earlier Binz Double Cabs have a custom bulkhead behind the front seat.

VW Fact #151: Binz Double Cabs were provided with factory-installed belly pans.

VW Fact #152: Belly pans were installed on sunroof and double-door Buses, as well as some special-order models.

 VW Fact #153: There are several variations of 36hp heater boxes

VW Fact #154: 36hp Buses use a single tip exhaust that exits directly to the rear of the vehicle

VW Fact #155: Double door panels are more common than other models with double doors.

VW Fact #156: The term "Double Door" indicates cargo doors installed on both sides of a Bus.

VW Fact #157: Buses could be ordered without a rear window, usually for commercial purposes.

VW Fact #158: Buses could be ordered in primer and many of these were custom painted for use in businesses.
 
VW Fact #159: The undercarriage of a Bus was painted with a high Zinc primer/sealer

VW Fact #160: Barndoor Buses have a narrower rear suspension and spring plates similar to a swinglaxle Bug.

VW Fact #161: Barndoor Buses had "lever shocks" in the rear instead of the more typical telescoping shocks.

VW Fact #162: Barndoor Buses have only a small "pod" for a dashboard, except for the Deluxe models, which have a full dash.

VW Fact #163: The first official production "walk-through" Bus was made in 1958.

VW Fact #164: Kombi production started in April, 1950

VW Fact #165: Microbus production started in June, 1950

VW Fact #166: June, 1950 marked the introduction of a partition between the cab and load area

VW Fact #167: In April, 1951, a rear window became standard on the rear of the Microbus

VW Fact #168: In December, 1951, the VW Ambulance began production at the VW factory, it was previously built by Miesen

VW Fact #169: In 1951, the Kombi was first available with a sliding sunroof

VW Fact #170: "Double-door" Buses were first made available in 1951

VW Fact #171: In August, 1952, the VW Pickup was introduced

VW Fact #172: 1952 - mid-1953 Single Cabs have smooth gates

VW Fact #173: 1967 Buses have a unique dual-circuit master cylinder

VW Fact #174: Westfalia Campers were the only VW-Authorized campers to be based on the Kombi model instead of the Panel.

VW Fact #175: 1958 and earlier walk-through Hardtop Deluxes (15-windows) are less prevelant than the later models.

VW Fact #176: Barndoor Bus windshields are shorter in height than March, 1955 - 1967 Buses.

VW Fact #177: Pre-68 Commercial Buses were shipped from the factory without a rear view mirror.

VW Fact #178: United States dealerships would often add larger side mirrors to early Buses at an extra charge.

VW Fact #179: United States dealerships would often chrome front and rear bumpers on the Deluxe model Buses for an extra charge.

VW Fact #180: Barndoor Bus front wheel cylinders are 22mm in diameter.

VW Fact #181: Barndoor Bus rear wheel cylinders are 19mm in diameter and are interchangeable with Oval Window Bug fronts.

VW Fact #182: 40hp and 1500cc Buses use a single tip exhaust that exits to the side of the vehicle

VW Fact #183: Bus interior panels had a plastic seal between the door panel and the door to prevent warpage from moisture.

VW Fact #184: It is important for all factory warm-up pieces to be in place for maximum engine life and performance.

VW Fact #185: Early Buses used bias ply tires, size 5.50 x 16 for 1950-March, 1955 and 6.40 x 15 for 55-63.

VW Fact #186: There are 3 styles of pre-68 Double Cab rear seat bottoms and seat stands.
VW Fact #187: Buses from March, 1955 to July, 1961 had a fuel reserve knob

VW Fact #188: 1966 marked the formal introduction of the Type 3 into the U.S. market.

VW Fact #189: 1965 was the last year of 5-lug brakes on the Type 3, as well as the last year of drum front brakes.

VW Fact #190: The Type 3 fuel injection is reliable when maintained properly.

VW Fact #191: N-model Type 3s do not have pop-out windows.

VW Fact #192: 1965 and earlier Type 3s have a "wrap-around" dash.

VW Fact #193: 1965 and earlier S model Type 3s have 2 piece front door panels and full-length arm rests.

VW Fact #194: 1960-1967 Buses have an exhaust that exits to the side of the
vehicle to prevent entry of exhaust gases through the rear door.

VW Fact #195: In 1952, the VW Bus horn button was changed from a smooth to a more dome-like, ribbed appearance. It changed back in 1955 to a smooth appearance but the diameter was reduced.

VW Fact #196: Buses were available with no rear window as an option.

VW Fact #197: Front Bus shocks were originally painted grey or black

VW Fact #198: Front Type 3 shocks were originally painted grey or black

VW Fact #199: Rear Bus shocks were originally painted grey until 1965

VW Fact #200: Rear Bus shocks were originally painted dark blue from 1965-1967

VW Fact #201: Rear Type 3 shocks were originally painted brown-red

VW Fact #202: 1959 Binz Double Cabs have a larger rear door but it is not suicide like the earlier models

VW Fact #203: The earliest known Binz-produced Double Cab is a Barndoor model

VW Fact #204: Volkswagen Double Cabs have a heater outlet for the rear seat located in the front seat bulkhead

VW Fact #205: VW Squareback/Variant production started on December 15, 1961 with VIN # 0 006 827

VW Fact #206: VW Type 3 Ghia production started on September 29, 1961 with VIN # 0 000 269

VW Fact #207: The VW Type 3 64-65 N models have single-speed wipers, no parking lights, and small front indicator 'bullets'. Pop-out windows were an optional extra.

VW Fact #208: The VW Type 3 Ghia was the most expensive VW model at the time of sale

VW Fact #209: Only 42,510 Type 3 Ghias were ever produced by VW and Karmann

VW Fact #210: Of the 42,510 Type 3 Ghias produced, approximately 70% remained in Germany (30,000) and 30% were exported (12,500)

VW Fact #211: The Type 34 Registry believes that there are approximately 2500 remaining Type 34s worldwide
 
VW Fact #212: There were 2 versions of T34 convertibles. The first attempt produced perhaps a handful of cars as Karmann tried to work out the structural kinks and eventually prompted VW to scrap both the T34 convertible and the Notch convertible.

VW Fact #213: There is only one known original T34 from Karmann's first attempts at creating the Type 34 Convertible. It has spent its whole life in Osnabrueck.

VW Fact #214: In late '62 Karmann made slight structural changes in their second convertible Type 34 prototype. Parts were produced for about 15 cars, 10 of which were completed. Karmann also submitted the pages to be included in the parts book.

VW Fact #215: The 1966 Type 3 Ghia was first the first stock VW to have a maximum speed of 90 mph.

VW Fact #216: 64-65 Type 3s used smooth rims, similar to Beetle rims but with a unique hubcap attachment

VW Fact #217: 61-early 64 Type 3s used slotted 15 inch rims, similar in appearance to pre-64 Bus rims but with a unique hubcap attachment

VW Fact #218: The early Type 3 tool kit included a large wrench used to adjust the fan belt tension

VW Fact #219: Pre-1966 Type 3s had rubber floormats instead of carpet over the floorpan. Carpet was used only in the footwells and over the inside rocker panels.

VW Fact #220: The 1961-63 Type 3 heater was overdesigned and could easily melt the plastic heat exchangers under the rear seat if left running full blast. The design was changed in 1964 to incorporate a fresh-air mixer.

VW Fact #221: The 1964-65 Type 3 1500cc S dual carbureted engine was high-compression and required Super Premium gasoline. It produced as much hp as later 1600cc engines.

VW Fact #222: 1961-63 Type 3s had grey Z-shaped armrests while 64-65 models had black armrests.

VW Fact #223: In 1965, the T-handle for the Bug rear hatch was changed to a push button on the Deluxe/Export models. Standard Beetles were changed in 1966.

VW Fact #224: In 1964, the Deluxe Beetle decklid was changed and a new, larger license plate light holder was added. Standard models kept the older style until supplies were exhausted.

VW Fact #225: The AG engine has dish pistons to lower compression to 6.6:1 for low octane fuel.

VW Fact #226: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Beetle, model 111, delivered in Wolfsburg, cost $1795.

VW Fact #227: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Beetle, model 113, delivered in Wolfsburg, cost $1915.

VW Fact #228: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Sunroof Beetle, model 117, delivered in Wolfsburg, cost $1994.

VW Fact #229: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Fastback, delivered in Wolfsburg, cost $2446.

VW Fact #230: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Sunroof Fastback, delivered in Wolfsburg, cost $2552.

VW Fact #231: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Squareback, delivered in Wolfsburg, cost $2528.

VW Fact #232: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Sunroof Squareback, delivered in Wolfsburg, cost $2634.

VW Fact #234: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Karmann Ghia Covertible, delivered in Osnabruek, cost $2796.

VW Fact #235: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Karmann Ghia Coupe, delivered in Osnabruek, cost $2552.

VW Fact #236: A 1972 Tourist Delivery 9-passenger Bus, delivered in Hannover, cost $3358.

VW Fact #237: A 1972 Tourist Delivery 7-passenger Bus, delivered in Hannover, cost $3282.

VW Fact #238: A 1972 Tourist Delivery 7-passenger Sunroof Bus, delivered in Hannover, cost $3426.

VW Fact #239: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Kombi with seats, delivered in Hannover, cost $3057.

VW Fact #240: A 1972 Tourist Delivery Campmobile Bus, delivered in Wiedenbruek, cost between $3668-4129, depending on options.

VW Fact #241: In 1972, a Blaupunkt Wolfsburg AM radio cost $62

VW Fact #242: In 1972, a Blaupunkt Emden AM/FM radio cost $84.50

VW Fact #243: In 1972, it was $148 for the Beetle automatic stick shift option
 
VW Fact #244: In 1972, it was $148 for the Ghia automatic stick shift option

VW Fact #245: In 1972, it was $230 for the Type 3 automatic transmission option

VW Fact #246: In 1972, optional whitewall tires for the Beetle were $24

VW Fact #247: In 1972, optional whitewall tires for the Ghia were $24

VW Fact #248: In 1972, optional whitewall tires for the Fastback were $27.50

VW Fact #249: In 1972, optional whitewall tires for the Squareback were $29

VW Fact #250: In 1965, VW of America estimated that there were 2,000,000 Beetles on the road in the USA

VW Fact #251: As of 1965, VWoA had a network of 14 distributors with over 1,000 dealers covering the 50 states

VW Fact #252: In 1966, VWoA was importing vehicles via ship at the rate of a little more than one per day into 16 US ports. Each ship could hold up to 1800 vehicles.

VW Fact #253: In 1966, the average investment in a VW dealership was over $250,000

VW Fact #254: In 1965, the world-wide sales of Volkswagenwerk AG was $2,325,000,000 with an annual production of 1,500,000 vehicles

VW Fact #255: From, 1948-1965, Volkswagenwerk AG had invested about $1,275,000,000 into its plants and facilities

VW Fact #256: As of 1965, Volkswagen was doing business in 130 countries through 7700 sales and service points.

VW Fact #257: As of 1965, Volkswagen had a fleet of 60 ships to deliver VWs around the world

VW Fact #258: In 1965, Volkswagen operated 6 plants in West Germany, employing about 100,000 men and women

VW Fact #259: As of 1965, the six VW plants in Germany contained 135 miles of continuous conveyor lines

VW Fact #260: In 1965, the Wolfsburg factory covered 377 acres with 10,000 production machines powered by a 270,000 kw generating plant that also heated and lit the city of 80,000

VW Fact #261: In 1965, the Hannover truck factory occupied 93 acres.

VW Fact #262: In 1965, the Hannover factory produced, in addition to the VW Bus, all the engines for Wolfsburg, Emden, and Ingolstadt passenger car lines

VW Fact #263: The Volkswagen 1500cc engine contains 40 lbs. of Magnesium

VW Fact #264: In 1965, Volkswagen was the world's largest consumer of the lightweight metal Magnesium

VW Fact #265: The VW Emden factory was built on 40 acres in 1964 at a cost of $65,000,000 to assemble vehicles for the United States and Canada

VW Fact #266: The VW factory at Kassel specialized in transmission gears and and front suspension assemblies for trucks and station wagons.

VW Fact #267: The VW factory at Brunswick produced the front axle units for use at the Wolfsburg and Emden production lines in a factory covering 18 acres

VW Fact #268: In 1965, in addition to German production, Volkswagens were made in 12 other countries: Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, Brazil, Ireland, Mexico, the Philippines, Portugal, South Africa, Turkey, Uruguay, and Venzuela

VW Fact #269: In 1965, worldwide VW production was about 7,000 vehicles every working day of the year

VW Fact #270: In 1965, the VWoA sales and service network employed 30,000 people

VW Fact #271: In 1965, Volkswagenwerk produced one VW every 13 seconds, 5,600 times a day.

VW Fact #272: In 1965, there were 10 ports of entry in the US, including Port Newark, Baltimore, Lake Charles, Chicago, Portland, and San Francisco.

VW Fact #273: VW operated a fleet of about 60 charter vessels in 1965 to unload on average of 1,300 VWs per day at US ports of entry.

VW Fact #274: In two daily shifts, the 46,000 workers at the Wolfsburg plant produced 4,700 cars a day in 1965.

VW Fact #275: There were 3,500 imported Italian workers employed at the Wolfsburg Plant in 1965.

VW Fact #276: In the first stage of a VW factory paint job, the steel body is submerged in a primer dip, dried, and wet-sanded.

VW Fact #278: In the third stage of a VW factory paint job, the prime coat is baked hard, then wet-sanded. This is followed by a second electrostatic prime coat, which is again baked and wet-sanded.

VW Fact #279: In the fourth and final stage of a VW factory paint job, the enamel color coat is sprayed on by hand and baked to a tough finish.

VW Fact #280: Paint was sprayed into loose fender joints, which were not tightened until the finish coat was completely dry.

VW Fact #281: In 1965, chromed bumpers received a coating of copper plate followed by a coating of nickel and two coatings of chromium.

VW Fact #282: VWs destined for export were sprayed with a protective paraffin-based coating, which was washed off at the dealership.

VW Fact #283: In 1965, the Hanover plant produced over 800 finished Transporters per day.

VW Fact #284: The Hanover plant produced all VW engines, many engine parts, and almost all castings, pouring 60 million lbs. of magnesium each year. (1965)

VW Fact #285: In 1965, the Hanover plant employed 23,000 workers.

VW Fact #286: All of VW's aluminum cylinder heads originated from Hanover plant.

VW Fact #287: At the Hanover plant, crankcase halves were kept in matched pairs to ensure total accuracy of the bore.

VW Fact #288: At the Hanover plant, completed engines were started, flushed out, filled with oil, and run 2 1/2 minutes on propane gas while workers made adjustments.

VW Fact #289: The Kassel plant employed 11,000 workers in 1965 and produced no finished vehicles

VW Fact #291: The Kassel plant supplied front suspension assemblies for Transporters.

VW Fact #292: As of 1965, all exchange parts, from carburetors to camshafts, were reconditioned at the Kassel plant.

VW Fact #293: The Brunswick plant, the smallest of the VW plants, employed 5,000 people in 1965.

VW Fact #294: As of 1965, the Brunswick plant produced front-end assemblies for sedans only.

VW Fact #295: In 1965, the Brunswick plant occupied a 50 acre site.

VW Fact #296: The Brunswick plant supplied both the Wolfsburg and Emden plants in 1965.

VW Fact #297: The Emden assembly plant began operations in December of 1964.
VW Fact #298: VW built a plant in Emden for three reasons: the port was within a mile of the factory, efficient rail facilities, and a labor surplus.

VW Fact #299: The Emden plant site was built on a cabbage farm.

VW Fact #300: Other than manufacturing seats and cable harnesses, Emden was solely an assembly plant.

VW Fact #301: In 1965, 25% of all VWs produced were shipped to the US.

VW Fact #303: Competition Motors in Los Angeles, CA, was appointed a VW distributorship in the spring of 1953.

VW Fact #304: Brundage Motors in Jacksonville, FL, loaned a new panelvan, dubbed the "Auction Express" to WJCT-TV for two months in 1963 for the television station's annual fund drive.

VW Fact #305: In 1963, Princess Grace of Monoco was presented two scale model Volkswagens at the official opening of the Travel and Vacation Show in Philadelphia.

VW Fact #307: In 1962, American travelers purchased 350 new Volkswagens in Hamburg, Germany, all ordered under Tourist Delivery.

VW Fact #308: American "Tourist Delivery customers picking up cars in Hamburg in 1962 were presented a bouquet of flowers and personal instructions on the workings of their new car and how to drive it.

VW Fact #309: In 1962, American VW distributorships began offering "portable tent-like garages". There were no sales as of July, 1963 of what we now call "car covers".

VW Fact #310: Overall German auto production rose 15% during the first quarter of 1963. Volkswagen was the export leader with a 28% sales growth from it's first quarter in 1962.

VW Fact #311: After selling 271,000 cars, Volkswagen ranked 10th among U.S. domestic automobile sales in 1963.

VW Fact #312: In 1963, VW dealers invested more than $23,000,000 in new or enlarged buildings in the U.S.

VW Fact #313: In 1963, VWoA trained 3,802 new mechanics.

VW Fact #314: By the end of 1963, more than 20,000 people were selling and servicing Volkswagens in the US.

VW Fact #315: At the end of 1963 there were 744 Volkswagen dealers in the US.

VW Fact #316: Dr. Heinz Nordhoff, Volkswagenwerk's managing director from 1948-1968, was featured on the February 15, 1954 issue of Time Magazine.

VW Fact #317: There was a 20% increase in US Volkswagen sales from 1962 to 1963, mainly due to a more extensive dealer network.

VW Fact #319: VWoA began a TV ad campaign in January 1963, targeting shows including Perry Mason, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and Rawhide.

VW Fact #320: In 1963, Volkswagen began offering a scholarship grant to qualified dependents of a VW employee for one year's study at a European university of his choice.

VW Fact #321: In 1963 it was announced that Volkswagen dealers would sell auto insurance covered by the Vico Insurance Company. Vico offered coverage to VW owners only.

VW Fact #322: In 1963, VWoA established a complete health program to all VW dealer employees - hospital, major medical, plus loss of income insurance.

VW Fact #323: Volkswagenwerk announced 1962 annual sales of $1,370,000,000.
 
VW Fact #324: In 1963, Volkswagenwerk invited 90 German newspapermen on a 1-week visit to the U.S. to witness VW's success in America.

VW Fact #325: In the early 1960s, Volkswagenwerk offered dealer tours for principal owners of American VW dealerships to tour the German factories.

VW Fact #326: The unit repair room in a VW dealership specialized in repairing engines, transmissions, and front axles.

VW Fact #327: In 1964 Volkswagen standardized the appearance and layout of its automobile dealership design.
 
VW Fact #328: In 1964, the owner of Double D Poultry in Georgia bought a new VW 211 panel to deliver from 800 to 1000 cases of eggs per month. The panel carried 50 cases (or 18,000) eggs at a time.

VW Fact #329: In 1964, the 100,000th VW to be imported through the Port of San Francisco was presented to its owners: Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Keifer of San Francisco.

VW Fact #330: On April 12, 1964, an initial supply of American Campmobile kits (deluxe Model #404) were shipped to Hanover for installation in VW panel delivery trucks.

VW Fact #331: Advance orders for the Hanover factory-assembled Campmobile model totalled 260 by April 1, 1964. They included gray and beige flecked upholstery, beige curtains, and wood-grained Micarta cabinets.

VW Fact #332: In 1965, the "Think Customer" program outlined 7 things VW customers want: a smile, his questions answered, to be phoned, a clean car, repairs as promised, no excuses, and his car delivered on time
VW Fact #333: During the first quarter of 1964, U.S. VW dealers sold an average of 28.4 cars per month.

VW Fact #334: In 1964, VWoA identified 4 preventable customer service complaints: Incomplete repair/wrong diagnosis, poor workmanship, warranty refusal, and discourtesy/delivery shortcomings.

VW Fact #335: About 500,000 imported cars were sold in the U.S. in 1964, 300,000 of those were Volkswagens.

VW Fact #336: In 1964, foreign competitors in the same size and price class as VW included Opel, Datsun, Saab, Renault (R-8 and Dauphine), Cortina, Triumph 1200, Austin 850, Simca 1000, MG 1100, and Sunbeam Imp.

VW Fact #337: In 1964, Mid-America Cars, Inc, VW distributor for Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska, employed 56 people and supplied 43 VW dealers.

VW Fact #338: In 1964, Brundage Motors, Inc, VW distributor for Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, employed 125 people and supplied 59 VW dealers.

VW Fact #339: In 1964, Reynold C. Johnson Company, VW distributor for Northern California, Northern Nevada, and Utah, employed 74 people and supplied 49 VW dealers.

VW Fact #340: In 1964, Int'l Auto Sales and Service, VW distributor for Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee, employed 80 people and supplied 40 VW dealers.

VW Fact #341: In 1964, Riviera Motors, Inc., VW distributor for Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, employed 165 people and supplied 62 VW dealers.

VW Fact #343: In 1964, Import Motors of Chicago, Inc., VW distributor for Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, and Wisconsin, employed 123 people and supplied 82 VW dealers.

VW Fact #344: In 1964, Import Motors, Ltd., VW distributor for Michigan and Indiana, employed 98 people and supplied 52 VW dealers.

VW Fact #345: In 1964, Inter-Continental Motors Corp., VW distributor for Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming, employed 78 people and supplied 53 VW dealers.

VW Fact #346: In 1964, Capitol Car Distributors, Ltd., VW distributor for Maryland, North Carolina, Eastern Tennessee, Virgina, West Virginia, and Washington D.C., employed 114 people and supplied 52 VW dealers.

VW Fact #347: In 1964, World-Wide Automobiles Corp., VW distributor for New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, employed 175 people and supplied 91 VW dealers.

VW Fact #348: In 1964, Midwestern VW Corp., VW distributor for Kentucky and Ohio, employed 62 people and supplied 48 VW dealers.

VW Fact #349: In 1964, VW France opened a new retail center near the Eiffel Tower on Rue de L'Eglise, used exclusively to deliver tourist-ordered autos to Americans.

VW Fact #350: In 1964, VW advertised the Bus in the following U.S. magazines: Life, Sports Illustrated, Time, U.S. News, New Yorker, Saturday Review, Atlantic, Harper's, and Sunset.

VW Fact #351: In 1964, people who bought Volkswagens fit the following demographic: 36 years old, yearly household income of $9,000, most were college educated.
 
VW Fact #352: In 1964, VW gave away a 30" cardboard box pull-toy to kids as a tie-in with the "Get a box" ad campaign.

VW Fact #353: In May, 1964, VW dealers had a monthly sales record of 24,305 passenger cars and 3,603 Transporters.

VW Fact #354: In 1964, VW's film "How To See More" featuring one family's tour through France in a Deluxe, was created to promote the foreign Tourist Delivery business. Prints were available to dealers for $80

VW Fact #355: 1962 Volkswagenwerk AG total Bug sales were 820,313, (including sales to other markets).

VW Fact #356: 1963 Volkswagenwerk AG total Bug sales were 773,994, (including sales to other markets).

VW Fact #357: 1962 Volkswagenwerk AG total Type 3 sales were 125,907, (including sales to other markets).

VW Fact #358: 1963 Volkswagenwerk AG total Type 3 sales were 182,463, (including sales to other markets).

VW Fact #359: 1962 Volkswagenwerk AG total Transporter sales were 166,457, (including sales to other markets).

VW Fact #360: 1963 Volkswagenwerk AG total Transporter sales were 174,556, (including sales to other markets).

VW Fact #361: VW of Brazil sold 39,153 Bugs in 1962.

VW Fact #362: VW of Brazil sold 44,224 Bugs in 1963.

VW Fact #363: VW of Brazil sold 14,516 Transporters in 1962.

VW Fact #364: VW of Brazil sold 14,430 Transporters in 1963.

VW Fact #365: VW of Australia sold 17,319 Bugs in 1962.

VW Fact #366: VW of Australia sold 10,030 Bugs in 1963.

VW Fact #367: Volkswagenwerk AG export sales increased to 60.6% of total sales during 1963.

VW Fact #368: In 1962 and 1963, Volkswagenwerk was the largest private consumer of raw materials in West Germany.

VW Fact #369: In 1963, vehicles produced by Volkswagenwerk accounted for 42% of the total production in West Germany.
 
VW Fact #370: Volkswagen Canada sold 30,109 cars in 1963.

VW Fact #371: VWoA sold 277,785 cars in 1963.

VW Fact #372: Volkswagen of Brazil sold 58,665 cars in 1963.

VW Fact #373: Volkswagen of South Africa sold 18,611 cars in 1963.

VW Fact #374: Volkswagen of Australia sold 27,861 cars in 1963.

VW Fact #375: Volkswagen France sold 15,087 cars in 1963.

VW Fact #376: Volkswagenwerk sold 346,146 Bugs in West Germany in 1962.

VW Fact #377: Volkswagenwerk sold 273,655 Bugs in West Germany in 1963.

VW Fact #378: Volkswagenwerk sold 74,994 Type 3s in West Germany in 1962.

VW Fact #379: Volkswagenwerk sold 109,240 Type 3s in West Germany in 1963.

VW Fact #380: Volkswagenwerk sold 63,924 Transporters in West Germany in 1962.

VW Fact #381: Volkswagenwerk sold 62,355 Transporters in West Germany in 1963.

VW Fact #382: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 274,509 Bugs and Type 3s to North and South America.

VW Fact #383: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 274,509 Bugs and Type 3s to North and South America.

VW Fact #384: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 43,996 Transporters to North and South America.

VW Fact #385: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 242,232 Bugs and Type 3s to the rest of Europe.

VW Fact #386: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 242,232 Bugs and Type 3s to the rest of Europe.

VW Fact #387: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 55,271 Transporters to the rest of Europe.

VW Fact #388: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 26,665 Bugs and Type 3s to Africa.

VW Fact #389: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 26,665 Bugs and Type 3s to Africa.

VW Fact #390: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 5,485 Transporters to Africa.

VW Fact #392: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 13,895 Bugs and Type 3s to Asia.

VW Fact #393: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 3,409 Transporters to Asia.

VW Fact #394: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 7,537 Bugs and Type 3s to Australia and the Pacific Islands.

VW Fact #395: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 7,537 Bugs and Type 3s to Australia and the Pacific Islands.

VW Fact #396: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 3,119 Transporters to Australia and the Pacific Islands.

VW Fact #398: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 8,724 Bugs and Type 3s through the Tourist Delivery program.

VW Fact #399: During 1963, Volkswagenwerk exported 921 Transporters through the Tourist Delivery program.

VW Fact #400: VW simplified its engine exchange program in 1964, stocking three basic engines rather than the previous eight.

VW Fact #401: In 1964 "Device AB for Hand Operating of Controls of VW by Disabled Persons" sold for about 382 DM. It could be purchased directly from the German manufacturer and installed at the VW dealer.

VW Fact #403: In 1964, the VW passenger car dominated other cars at the lower end of the compact price range: Chevy II, Comet, Corvair, Dart, Falcon, Rambler Classic and American, and the Valiant.

VW Fact #404: The average depreciation of a 1960 VW after four years was 35%, compared to 65% in American cars and 85% for Renault.

VW Fact #405: The average resale value of a 1960 VW after four years was 65%, compared to 35% in American cars and 20% for Renault.

VW Fact #406: In 1964, sailors aboard the heavy cruiser U.S.S. St. Paul bought a VW Bus with funds from the ship's company. The bus was used for errands that didn't qualify for official Navy transportation.

VW Fact #407: VW replaced the 7-digit serial number system with a 9-digit system at the beginning of the 1965 model year. The 7-digit codes (excluding the model ID code) were still used on vehicle count and retail delivery cards.

VW Fact #408: Between June 29th and July 3rd, 1964, 4,968 people from 39 countries visited the VW plants at Wolfsburg and Hanover. The Wolfsburg plant attracted 4,446 of those tourists

VW Fact #409: Brundage Motors, Inc., the distributor for FL, GA, and SC, donated its 100,000th VW, a 1964 Bus, to the Baptist Home for Children in Jacksonville, FL.

VW Fact #410: VW's advertising "Blue Book" catalogued all available dealer ads in a 16" format.

VW Fact #411: VW dealers started selling the Squareback through the tourist delivery program January 1, 1964. Sold under the "coupon program", travelers could pick it up in Wolfsburg within 10 days of placing a U.S. order.
 
VW Fact #412: VW public relations films available in 1964 included "Fair Exchange", "A Time Like This", "The Right Hand of Plenty", "The Give and Take", and "Wolfsburg 221".

VW Fact #413: In December 1964, VW placed the "It Comes in its Own Box" Bus ad in the magazines Atlantic Monthly and Harper's Monthly.

VW Fact #414: The Ghia ad "Volkswagen Italian Style" appeared in Esquire, Sports Illustrated, and Time magazines in November and December 1964.

VW Fact #415: The VW ad "Sooner or later, your wife will drive home one of the best reasons for owning a Volkswagen" featuring a dented Bug, was cancelled in 1964 due to massive backlash from female VW drivers.

VW Fact #416: In 1964, mechanics at a Dallas VW dealership assembled a Bug out of their stock parts. The body parts were painted different colors to distinguish the 8 model years and show the parts were interchangeable.

VW Fact #417: "A Sure Thing" detailed the interrelated roles of distributors, dealers, and importers in the 1964 VWoA 18 minute, color film.

VW Fact #418: In 1964, VW led the industry with 190 average sales per dealer from January through June. Chevy averaged 170 and Ford averaged 129 cars per dealer in the same six month period.

VW Fact #419: In 1964, the ship's company of the U.S. Super Carrier KittyHawk purchased two Buses for use on non-Naval errands.

VW Fact #420: Starting in 1964, the Kelly-Springfield Tire Company (a subsidiary of Goodyear Tire) manufactured "economy" tires for VWoA under the name "Autobahn".

VW Fact #421: Infants born in a VW were eligible for a $50 savings bond under the VWoA sponsored "Bonds for Babies" program during the 1960s.

VW Fact #422: #1 on the 1965 VW dealer service checklist was "Avoid answering complaints with an off-hand: 'All VWs have that trouble". It's not true, and besides, small consolation to the owner."

VW Fact #423: #2 on the 1965 VW dealer service checklist was "Be careful to come to complete agreement with the customer on what work is to be performed at what estimated cost, before the work is done."

VW Fact #424: #3 on the 1965 VW dealer service checklist was "When service is complete, road test the car. Be sure to check performance of the car against the instructions on the work order."

VW Fact #425: #4 on the 1965 VW dealer service checklist was "Is the car as clean as it was when it came in? Look sharply and remove grease smudges on the steering wheel."

VW Fact #426: #5 on the 1965 VW dealer service checklist was "Deliver the car when promised."

VW Fact #427: #1 on the 1965 VW dealer sales checklist was "Sell all the benefits of VW ownership in terms of the prospective customer's personal likes, desires."
 
VW Fact #428: #2 on the 1965 VW dealer sales checklist was "Sell the entire dealership, stress the parts supply, service availability, as well as product features."

VW Fact #429: #3 on the 1965 VW dealer sales checklist was "Don't put the prospect on the accessory escalator. By all means, do a conscientious job of selling, but don't force the extras."

VW Fact #430: #4 on the 1965 VW dealer sales checklist was "At delivery, don't let any new owner get away without first giving a full explanation of the VW warranty and the necessity of periodical preventive maintenance necessary to keep the warranty in full effect."

VW Fact #431: #5 on the 1965 VW dealer sales checklist was "Don't let any new owner get away without first accompanying him on a familiarization drive. During the drive, make sure he knows how to operate all controls."

VW Fact #432: Customer relations acronyms used by VW included NBC (Nothing But Customers), TACH (Treat All Customers Honestly), ABC (Another Beautiful Customer), SKIT (Simply Keep in Touch), and APT (A Personal Touch).

VW Fact #433: On December 20, 1964, the crew of a charter vessel carrying 1187 VWs destined for Long Beach, CA, rescued 34 men adrift in a lifeboat from their sinking grain-filled U.S. cargo ship.

VW Fact #435: In 1965, VW promoted the new side step accessory to "help tight-skirted women, short-legged children, or bundle-laden men" step into a VW Transporter.

VW Fact #436: To promote the 1965 Campmobile, VWoA placed four full-page black and white ads with insertions in the March, April, May, and June issues of America's three biggest sporting magazines: Field & Stream, Outdoor Life, and Sports Afield.

VW Fact #437: The harbor at Emden, where Bugs and Type 3s were assembed for export, was always ice-free. This advantage was a by-product of the local power station's discharge of heated water.

VW Fact #438: The harbor at Emden, where Bugs and Type 3s were assembed for export, was always ice-free. This advantage was a by-product of the local power station's discharge of heated water.

VW Fact #439: In early 1965, Japan imported its 10,000th VW from Wolfsburg.

VW Fact #440: In early 1965, Spain imported its 10,000 VW from Wolfsburg.

VW Fact #441: In early 1965, Finland imported its 50,000th VW from Wolfsburg.

VW Fact #442: In early 1965, Pakistan imported its 5,000th VW from Wolfsburg.

VW Fact #443: In early 1965, Nigeria imported its 15,000th VW from Wolfsburg.

VW Fact #444: In early 1965, Tunis imported its 1,000th VW from Wolfsburg.

VW Fact #446: Gardner Motors of Fresno, CA, donated 150 Bus "box" toys to the Fresno Catholic Diocese for Christmas, 1964. The boxes were used to carry food to needy families , and when emptied, became toys for the children.

VW Fact #448: Walter Stamm of Portland, OR, was the first American to take delivery of a Squareback in Wolfsburg on the first day it was made available under the Tourist Delivery program.

VW Fact #449: Suggested retail list price of the VW Squareback at the Wolfsburg factory was $1,752 in 1965.

VW Fact #450: VW dealers could order the 1965 book, Small Wonder, for $2.67 each plus shipping. The books were sold to the public for $4.95.

VW Fact #451: Volkswagen, the official car at the 1965 International Surfing Meet at Makaha, HI, donated eight Bugs and a Bus for the event.

VW Fact #452: Starting in 1965, American tourists could pick up a new VW in Spain, Austria, or Luxembourg, increasing the number of European delivery points available under the TD program to 53 cities in 12 countries.

VW Fact #453: The 1965 30-minute documentary, "The Way of A Ship", from the VW film library, highlighted the 64 Volkswagen transport ships.


VW Fact #454: A 1965 VW dealer advertising campaign targeted owners of '61 to '63 domestic compact station wagons: Comet, Dart, Dodge, Fairlane, Falcon, Lancer, Plymouth, Rambler, Studebaker, and Valiant. The mailer suggested they "buy a box".

VW Fact #455: In 1965, VW dealers offered the Bus Lunchbox as part of the advertising campaign to win market share from domestic station wagons.

VW Fact #456: In 1965, VWoA advised dealers to provide customers with a dealer-identified licence plate frame instead of the usual dealer sticker placed directly on the car.

VW Fact #457: In 1965, a VW dealership in Hawaii created a life-size "Lunchbox" by attaching dummy clasps to the side of a Bus.

VW Fact #458: In 1965, Mexico City accounted for more than 50% of the total number of Volkswagens sold in Mexico.

VW Fact #459: Michigan radio station WERX, had a custom crafted broadcasting station made at their local VW dealer. The logo'd, 18' mobile transmitter, created by combining two Kombis, began operating on July 1, 1965.

VW Fact #460: In 1965, VWoA increased its summer advertising budget by $275,000.
 
VW Fact #461: In 1965, Airport Motors, a Honolulu, Hawaii VW dealer, built a regulation sized golf green in front of its dealership for customer use.

VW Fact #462: When Airport Motors VW dealership opened in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1965, 500 people attended the opening. Guest included the governer of Hawaii, the city and county mayors, and one of Hawaii's state senators.

VW Fact #463: During the 1965 Fall/Winter TV season, VW ran new commercials during shows like "The Wild West", "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea", "The Man From UNCLE", "Wide World of Sports", "Big Valley", and "Gunsmoke".

VW Fact #464: Ed Dewey celebrated the 10th anniversary of his Memphis, TN VW dealership by treating his oldest customer's Bug to an inspection, free paint job, and a new set of hubcaps

VW Fact #465: A 1959 VW Single Cab carries 1,764 pounds payload on a 45 square foot bed.

VW Fact #466: A 1959 VW Panelvan carries 1,830 pounds payload in 170 cubic feet.

VW Fact #467: A 1959 Kombi, with the seats out, can carry a 1,786 pound payload.

VW Fact #468: A 1959 Single Cab, Kombi, or Panel cost about half as much to run as a 1/2 ton truck, yet it carried about 80% more payload.

VW Fact #469: The 1963 Dormobile Caravan featured four new "Dormatic" adjustable rear seats.

VW Fact #470: Vinyl covered walls, 2 roof windows, a 2-burner gas stove, a sink with drain, curtains on all windows, "Dormatic" seats, wardrobe, and a blanket locker were part of the standard equipment on the 1963 Dormobile Caravan.

VW Fact #471: It took VW 14 years to sell the 1 millionth car in the U.S. in early 1963. The 2 millionth VW was sold in late 1965, less than 3 years later.

VW Fact #472: Starting in 1965, VWs delivered to Americans under the TD program bore the sticker "We saw Europe by Volkswagen".

VW Fact #473: A 1965 marketing survey revealed just how familiar Americans were with Volkswagens: 95% polled knew the car was air-cooled, 79% polled knew the VW had a 4-speed stick shift, and 84% said VWs delivered up to 32 mpg.

VW Fact #474: The Ace Cab Co. in Kodiak Alaska operated with 6 1965 VW Buses.

VW Fact #475: In the first three months of 1965, Kodiak Motors VW dealership in Alaska sold 33 Bugs and 12 Transporters in a town of 3,000 people.

VW Fact #476: In 1965, Higland Motors in East Moline, Illinois, displayed a fully restored 1950 113 Bug to increase traffic in their VW dealership.
 
VW Fact #477: In 1965, VWoA offered $25 for merchandising suggestions. Winning ideas had to be "easily and inexpensively implemented at dealerships and still produce maximum sales results".

VW Fact #478: William Stockdale's 1965 documentary "Back Roads and Friendly People" follows his family's trip around the U.S. in a VW Bus and is included in VWoA's film library.

VW Fact #479: In 1965, ADCO Producing Co., a Natchez, MS oil company, ordered nine Single Cabs from Germany. All were equipped with a 12 volt electrical system to provide power for mobile telephones and radios.

VW Fact #480: The Wolfsburg factory closed in July 1965 so the 47,500 employees could take their annual three-week paid vacations.

VW Fact #481: In July, 1965, Volkswagenwerk's factories in Hanover, Brunswick, Kassel, and Emden shut down so their 45,000 employees could take their annual three-week paid vacations.

VW Fact #482: Two Volkswagens were registered in the U.S. in 1949.

VW Fact #483: Max Hoffman, NYC, was awarded VW importing rights for the U.S. from 1950 until the end of 1953

VW Fact #484: Volkswagen United States was established in 1954 with headquarters at the St. Moritz Hotel in New York.

VW Fact #485: VWoA was founded in October, 1955, to develop and coordinate dealer growth and encourage the build up of service facilities and parts supplies.

VW Fact #486: VWoA established a public relations department in 1957.

VW Fact #487: There were 327 VW dealers in America in 1957.

VW Fact #488: When VWoA started advertising in 1959, they appointed two different ad agencies, one for Bugs and one for Transporters.

VW Fact #489: In 1960, VWoA established new departments for data processing and personnel.

VW Fact #490: At the beginning of 1960, one in four import cars sold in the U.S. was a VW; by year end, it was one in two.

VW Fact #491: In 1961, there were 16 distributorships, 628 dealers, and 14,900 employees in the Volkswagen organization.

VW Fact #492: Doyle, Dane, Bernbach ad agency took over all national VW advertising in May, 1961.

VW Fact #493: In 1964, VWoA received approval from the Federal Government for its apprentice-training program.

VW Fact #494: In 1950, 157 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #495: In 1951, 390 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #496: In 1952, 611 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #497: In 1953, 1,013 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #498: In 1954, 6,614 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #499: In 1955, 30,928 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #500: In 1956, 55,690 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.
« Siste redigering: januar 17, 2023, 20:21:45 pm av Endre S » Loggført

1974 1303 SilverBIGL
1971 1302 Cab
1963 Type 311
1967 Type 365 Squareback
X
1962 Type 343 Ghia 
1957 Type 111 (T111) 
1964 Type 311    
Type 1 are nice, Type 2 are cool, BUT Everyone knows, that  Type 3............RULE!\\\\\\\" 

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« Svar #1 på: desember 02, 2012, 16:59:16 pm »

VW Fact #501: In 1957, 79,524 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #502: In 1958, 104,306 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #503: In 1959, 150,601 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #504: In 1960, 191,372 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #505: In 1961, 203,863 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #506: In 1962, 222,740 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #507: In 1963, 277,008 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #508: In 1964, 343,263 Volkswagens were registered in the U.S.

VW Fact #509: Since the North American market purchased the largest share of VW exports, most of the factories' imported raw materials were purchased from the U.S. or Canada.

VW Fact #510: By the end of 1964, 12.5% of VW factory employees were female, and, due to the severe labor shortage in Germany, more than 7,700 employees were from Italy, Spain, Greece, and other foreign countries.

VW Fact #511: In 1964, 366,871 new Volkswagens were registered in Germany.

VW Fact #512: VW sold 8,234 cars through its Tourist Delivery program from January to June of 1965.

VW Fact #513: In 1965, VWoA considered a reputation for quality and honesty as fundamental to its success.

VW Fact #514: VW eliminated the 1,500 mile oil change and the 3,000 mile transmission oil change from the maintenance schedule for the 1966 VW.

VW Fact #515: In 1966, VW added the colors Sea Sand (all Type 1s), Poppy Red, and Manila Yellow (Bug vert) and dropped Panama Beige, Pacific Blue (Bug vert), Smoke Grey (Ghia), and Henna Red (Ghia)

VW Fact #516: In 1966, VW added the colors Sea Sand (all Type 1s), Poppy Red, and Manila Yellow (Bug vert) and dropped Panama Beige, Pacific Blue (Bug vert), Smoke Grey (Ghia), and Henna Red (Ghia).

VW Fact #517: In 1966, new tire pressures for VWs, regardless of the year of manufacture, were announced by the factory to provide better performance in all driving conditions.

VW Fact #518: The 1966 Type 3s have a front trunk with a capacity of 6.5 cubic feet.

VW Fact #519: The 1966 Fastback has a rear trunk capacity of 10.2 cubic feet.

VW Fact #520: The 1966 Squareback has a carrying area behind the rear seat of 24.7 cubic feet; but with the rear seat folded flat, 42.4 cubic feet of cargo space is available.

VW Fact #521: The Squareback's cargo area (with the rear seat folded flat) is 65.7 inches long and 48.0 inches wide - enough to accommodate two sleeping bags if the car is used for camping.

VW Fact #522: In 1966, the introduction of the Type 3 was said to represent "plus business" to retain current VW owners who might be thinking of buying another make of car.

VW Fact #523: The 1966 Type 3s were the first all new VWs to be introduced into the American market since the Karmann Ghia was announced in 1956.

VW Fact #524: To introduce their 1966 cars, including the new Type 3 models, VWoA sent over 1 million mailers to current Volkswagen owners.

VW Fact #525: 1966 accessories for Type 3s included a "sleep-in space extender", parcel shelf, Sapphire radio, terry cloth seat covers, rubber guards, back-up light, seat belts, ventshades, and cigarette lighter.

VW Fact #526: Wolfsburg produced the ten millionth Volkswagen on September 15th, 1965.

VW Fact #527: In 1965, more than 7,500 dealers handled VW sales and service in more than 130 countries.

VW Fact #528: In 1965, VWs were manufactured or assembled in 13 countries: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Ireland, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Portugal, South Africa, Turkey, Uruguay, Venezuela, and Germany.

VW Fact #529: In 1965, the six German VW plants total production exceeded 6,700 cars per day.

VW Fact #530: In 1961, Volkswagen purchased $7 million worth of tires, sealed-beam units, spark plugs, sheet steel, light metal, and other products from Canadian manufacturers.

VW Fact #531: In 1962, pistons for 250,000 Volkswagens were made from Canadian aluminum.

VW Fact #532: In the early 1960s, Volkswagen spent $2 million per year in Canada for stevedoring (longshoreman work) and transportation by rail and truck.

VW Fact #533: Volkswagen spent $1 million per year on newspaper, radio, and TV advertising in Canada in the early 1960s.

VW Fact #534: By 1962, Volkswagen, its distributors and dealers, occupied premises built at a cost of $50 million and employed 5,500 Canadians at an annual estimated payroll of $25 million.

VW Fact #535: Volkswagen purchased over $50 million worth of machinery in the U.S. from 1958 to 1961.

VW Fact #536: By 1961, 40% of Volkswagen's huge metal presses were purchased in the U.S. at a cost of $570,000 each.

VW Fact #537: Volkswagen bought $700,000 worth of steel and magnesium per month in the U.S. by 1961.

VW Fact #538: During its first 12 years of growth, Volkswagen received no financial aid from the government, relief organizations, or private individuals. All expansion came from the sale of cars in Germany and abroad.

VW Fact #539: At the end of 1961, VWoA employed over 16,000 Americans who took home a combined payroll of more than $1,500,000 each week.

VW Fact #540: In 1961, independent American dealers and distributors spent about $4 million on local radio, TV, and newspaper advertising. VWoA, the authorized importer, spent an additional $4 million during the year.

VW Fact #541: Between 1958 and 1961, VWoA paid the U.S. Government more than $100 million in excise taxes and duties.

VW Fact #542: Between 1958 and 1961, VWoA paid $4 million in longshoreman wages and $4 million in dock handling charges.

VW Fact #543: Between 1958 and 1961, VWoA spent $24 million to haul Volkswagens from ports of entry to distributors around the U.S.

VW Fact #544: In 1961, Volkswagen's 16 distributors and 600 dealers were independent American businessmen.

VW Fact #545: By 1961, Volkswagen dealers and distributors had invested $100 million of their own money for their sales and service facilities in the U.S.

VW Fact #546: In 1950 the Wolfsburg Factory produced 30 trucks (Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #547: In 1951 the Wolfsburg Factory produced 47 trucks (Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #548: In 1952 the Wolfsburg Factory produced 84 trucks (Single Cabs, Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #549: In 1953 the Wolfsburg Factory produced 106 trucks (Single Cabs, Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #550: In 1954 the Wolfsburg Factory produced 153 trucks (Single Cabs, Panels, and Kombis) per day

VW Fact #551: In 1955 the Wolfsburg Factory produced 189 trucks (Single Cabs, Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #552: In 1956 the Hanover Factory produced 247 trucks (Single Cabs, Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #553: In 1957 the Hanover Factory produced 383 trucks (Single Cabs, Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #554: In 1958 the Hanover Factory produced 420 trucks (Single Cabs, Panels, and Kombis) per day.

VW Fact #555: In the early 1960s, Criteria, a musical studio in Florida, purchased 3 new Standard Microbuses and had them fitted as mobile recording studios.

VW Fact #556: US VW dealers in the 1960s were forced to receive a certain number of commercial Buses in order to get their allotment of Beetles. This resulted in dealers having to fleet (sell cheap) their Buses to businesses.

VW Fact #557: In the 1960s, Reynold C Johnson Co., based in Burlingame, CA, used VW trucks for deliveries.

VW Fact #558: In the 1960s, Tru-Star Plastics, based in Brisbane, CA had a fleet (approx. 15) of VW Buses used for their business.

VW Fact #559: In the 1960s, K Plastics, based in CA, had a fleet of 5 VW Buses used for their business.

VW Fact #560: U.S. VW dealers sold about 11,300 cars under the Tourist Deliver Program during 1967, many of them to Americans who combined pleasure with business trips.

VW Fact #562: All VWs, manufactured after 1-1-68 for sale in the U.S., were certified by VW A.G. to conform to all federal motor vehicle safety standards.

VW Fact #563: In 1968, the safety certification sticker was mounted on the left hand door post about 1" below the door striker plate on Beetles, Transporters, and Type 3s. On the Karmann Ghia it was mounted 1" above the striker plate.

VW Fact #564: Volkswagen introduced the Automatic Stick Shift in 1968 Sedan and Karmann models.

VW Fact #565: Volkswagen introduced the Automatic Stick Shift in 1968 Sedan and Karmann models.

VW Fact #566: Volkswagen introduced the Automatic Stick Shift in 1968 Sedan and Karmann models.

VW Fact #567: In their 1968 media campaign to introduce the new Automatic Stick Shift, VW reached 43 million households an average of 7 times.

VW Fact #568: In January, February, and March of 1968, VW placed magazine ads for the new Automatic Stick Shift in Life, Look, Reader's Digest, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, Time, U.S. News & World report, Esquire, Playboy, New Yorker, Saturday review, and Sunset.

VW Fact #569: All 1968 Type 1s and Type 3s had front seat headrests. VW was ahead of the game - headrests were required by U.S. Federal law on all new cars sold after December 31st, 1968.

VW Fact #570: All 1968 Type 1s and Type 3s had front seat headrests. VW was ahead of the game - headrests were required by U.S. Federal law on all new cars sold after December 31st, 1968.

VW Fact #571: All 1968 Type 1s and Type 3s had front seat headrests. VW was ahead of the game - headrests were required by U.S. Federal law on all new cars sold after December 31st, 1968.

VW Fact #572: In a bizarre coincidence, the sales representative from Cameron Auto in Harrisburg, PA received his 1967 demo Beetle with Chassis Number 117 052 200. A year later, his 1968 demo Beetle arrived. It was Chassis Numer 118 052 200

VW Fact #573: Volkswagen produced its two-millionth commercial vehicle on February 5, 1968, in Hannover. The bus was presented to Aktion Sogenkind, a German organization which assisted mentally and physically disabled children.

VW Fact #574: A fleet of 50 transporters were lent to the municipality of Grenoble by Volkswagen France. They were used for shuttling VIP guests and officials during the 1968 Winter Olympics.

VW Fact #575: By 1968 there were 70 VW dealerships spread across dozens of islands in Atlantic and Caribbean waters, and through six Central American and five South American countries

VW Fact #576: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Valve guides were manufactured by Ampco Metal, Inc. Englewood, NJ.

VW Fact #577: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Electric fuel pumps were manufactured by Bendix Automotive Service Division, South Bend, IN.

VW Fact #578: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Batteries were manufactured by Prestolite Division, Electra Corp., Toledo, OH.

VW Fact #579: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Radios were manufactured by Bendix Corp, Baltimore, MD and Motorola Communications & Electronics Inc, Chicago, IL.

VW Fact #580: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Crankcase ventilation inserts and Ready Mount ski racks were manufactured by Zelenda Machine & Tools Corp, Forest Hills, NY.

VW Fact #581: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Lamps, sealed beam, miniature bulbs were manufactured by Westinghouse Lamp Division, Philadelphia, PA.

VW Fact #582: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Autobahn tires were manufactured by The Kelly-Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland, MD.

VW Fact #583: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Seat belts and emergency flashers were manufactured by American Safety Equipment Corp, ACME Division, Rochester, NY.

VW Fact #584: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Walnut gearshift knobs were manufactured by AMCO, a Division of American Carry Products, CO, North Hollywood, CA.

VW Fact #585: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Vinyl walnut dash kits were manufactured by Spartan Plastics Inc, Holt, MI.

VW Fact #586: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Tissue dispensers were manufactured by Gantner Industries, Inc, Morton Grove, IL.

VW Fact #587: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Mirrors, gravel guards, overriders, and Squareback luggage racks were manufactured by X-L-O Automotive Accessories, Inc, Yonkers, NY.

VW Fact #588: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Type 1 luggage racks were manufactured by Bay Standard Products Mfg. Co., Concord, CA.

VW Fact #589: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Wheel trim rings were manufactured by Del-Krome Corp, Walton, NY.

VW Fact #590: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Rubber bumper guards were manufactured by East Coast Specialties Corp, Yonkers, NY.

VW Fact #591: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Ventshades and protective trim items were manufactured by Auto Ventshades, Inc, Chamblee, GA.

VW Fact #592: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Trailer hitches were manufactured by Valley Tow-Rite, Inc, Lodi, CA.

VW Fact #593: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Cigarette Lighters were manufactured by Casco Products, Inc, Bridgeport, CT.

VW Fact #594: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Utility light kits were manufactured by John W. Hobbs Corp, Division of Stewart-Warner, Springfield, IL.

VW Fact #595: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Terry cloth and nylon/foam seat covers were manufactured by Budge Manufacturing Co. Inc, Philadelphia, PA.

VW Fact #596: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Leatherette seat covers were manufactured by Armco Chemical Co, Ridgewood, NJ

VW Fact #597: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Rubber floor mats were manufactured by Rubbermaid, Inc, Wooster, OH.

VW Fact #598: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Air conditioners were manufactured by Delanair Engineering Co, Fort Worth, TX.

VW Fact #599: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Campmobile water tanks were manufactured by INCA Plastics, Santa Fe Springs, CA.

VW Fact #600: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Campmobile electrical equipment was manufactured by Mobile Electric Sales, Inc, South San Gabriel, CA.

VW Fact #601: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Campmobile water pumps were manufactured by Delta Six Industries, Inc, Studio City, CA.

VW Fact #602: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Campmobile windows were manufactured by Hehr Manufacturing Co, Los Angeles, CA.

VW Fact #603: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Car care products were manufactured by Union Carbide Group, Consumer Products Division, New York, NY.

VW Fact #604: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Upholstery cleaner was manufactured by Armco Chemical Company, Ridgewood, NJ.

VW Fact #605: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Silicone spray was manufactured by Kelser Company, San Leandro, CA.

VW Fact #606: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Brake fluid was manufactured by Wagner Electric Corp, St Louis, MO.

VW Fact #607: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Auxilary heaters were manufactured by Stewart-Warner Corp, Indianapolis, IN.

VW Fact #608: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Top mount ski racks and luggage racks were manufactured by Market Forge, Everett MA.

VW Fact #609: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Generators and replacement starters were manufactured by Robert Bosch Corp, Long Island City, NY (European supplier manufacturing in the U.S.).

VW Fact #610: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Replacement clutches and brake shoes were manufactured by European Parts Exchange, Inc, Newark, NJ.

VW Fact #611: Late 1960s Volkswagen parts and accessories "Made in the U.S.A": Replacement speedometers were manufactured by V.D.O. Instruments, Detroit, MI (European supplier manufacturing in the U.S.).

VW Fact #612: In 1968, Riviera Motors distribution area covered nearly 1 million square miles, which included the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. It's 68 dealerships serviced more than 130,000 VWs.

VW Fact #613: VWoA's Modernized Dealership Building Program featured the "multi-purpose" building concept developed in 1965. The plan featured single, roof-level construction, and a large mezzanine and canopy.

VW Fact #614: During the first half of the 1968 model year, 52.8% of the Beetles sold in the U.S. were light blue, beige, or white.

VW Fact #615: During the first half of the 1968 model year, 47.2% of the Beetles sold in the U.S. were blue, green, red, or black.

VW Fact #616: Light Blue was the first color choice among buyers for 1968 model year Beetles, followed by red, beige, white, blue, green, and black.

VW Fact #617: Light Blue was the first color choice among buyers for 1967 model year Beetles, followed by red, beige, white, blue, green, and black.

VW Fact #619: To help instruct mechanics in the metric system, VWoA produced oversized working replicas of three tools: a three-foot high dial indicator, a four-foot vernier caliper, and a four-foot micro-meter.

VW Fact #620: In 1968, approximately 35,000 Americans were employed by members of the Volkswagen organization.

VW Fact #621: In 1968, each VW distributorship represented an investment of more than $2.5 million.

VW Fact #622: In 1968, each authorized dealer represented an average investment of $250,000.

VW Fact #623: There were 443,510 VWs sold in 1967 in the U.S.

VW Fact #624: In 1967, there were 452 average sales per VW dealer in the U.S.

VW Fact #625: VW Production milestones: Production began in March 1946.

VW Fact #626: VW Production milestones: 1 millionth VW - August 5, 1955.

VW Fact #627: VW Production milestones: 5 millionth VW - December 4, 1961.

VW Fact #628: VW Production milestones: 10 millionth VW - September 15, 1965.

VW Fact #629: VW Production milestones: 14 millionth VW - April 30, 1968.

VW Fact #630: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Beetle was $1699.

VW Fact #631: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Sunroof Beetle was $1789.

VW Fact #632: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Convertible Beetle was $2099.

VW Fact #633: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Karmann Ghia was $2254.

VW Fact #634: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Convertible Karmann Ghia was $2449.

VW Fact #635: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Fastback was $2179.

VW Fact #636: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Sunroof Fastback was $2299.

VW Fact #637: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Squareback was $2349.

VW Fact #638: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Sunroof Squareback was $2469.

VW Fact #639: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Kombi was $2499.

VW Fact #640: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Panelvan was $2299.

VW Fact #641: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Single Cab was $2299.

VW Fact #642: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Double Cab was $2389.

VW Fact #644: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Campmobile with Pop-Top was $3045.

VW Fact #645: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of the Campmobile with Pop-Top plus tent was $3185.

VW Fact #646: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of upgrading to whitewall tires was $29.50.

VW Fact #647: In 1968, the (East Coast) suggested retail price of upgrading to leatherette interior was $30.

VW Fact #649: In 1968, VWoA granted $200,000 towards the creation of a German Affairs Institute, to finance a guest Chair, and a research library at Indiana University.

VW Fact #650: In 1966, VWoA awarded a grant to the chairman of the German Department of Clark University, Worcester MA to support his research in German literature and the German language press in South American countries.

VW Fact #651: VW industrial engines used about 4 gallons of regular gas per hour at full load. Peak horsepower ratings ranged from 40 to 53 in 1968.

VW Fact #652: In spring of 1968, the first factory modified VW Bus taxi was introduced at the Frankfurt airport.

VW Fact #653: The first VW Beetle taxis were introduced in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 1961. Removal of the front passenger seat was the only modification.

VW Fact #654: Fiberglass dune buggy kits were sold under such trade names as Manx, The Deserter, Safari, Sportster, Burro, Ocelot, Roadrunner, and Vagabond.

VW Fact #655: In 1967 Volkswagen of Brazil produced 9,360 Commercials, 1,332 Karmann Ghias, and 41,929 passenger cars.

VW Fact #656: In 1968 Volkswagen of Brazil produced 12,395 Commercials, 2,036 Karmann Ghias, and 52,386 passenger cars.

VW Fact #657: In 1968, students in Halsingborg, Sweden learned German from donated VW brochures and advertising materials, and high achievers received VW toy models.

VW Fact #658: In 1968, VW licensed toy models from manufacturers Dinky Toys, Tonka Toys, Pyro Plastics, Renner, and Wiking.

VW Fact #659: Among the various VW toy models available in 1968 were the Campmobile, the Karmann Ghia, and the Bus Station Wagon.

VW Fact #660: Several 1968 VW toy models were in special versions: a VW Safari sedan, complete with a rhinoceros; a European Police Beetle; and an auto repair Single Cab.

VW Fact #661: Between 1967-1973, 97,043 new Type 3 Fastback Sedans were sold in the USA. The Squareback was far more popular compared to the Fastback worldwide, but especially so in the USA.

VW Fact #662: The 1972 Model Year Type 3 had the best performance of any Model Year Type 3 sold in the USA. It had the same top speed of 84 MPH (manual transmission), but 0-60 MPH acceleration was merely 13.8 seconds.

VW Fact #663: Volkswagen do Brasil manufactured 297,773 Squarebacks, called the "Variant" throughout markets in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa and Asia, from 1969-1982.

VW Fact #664: 1969 was the final year the US market had the 1493ccm motor in the Beetle and Beetle Convertible models.

VW Fact #665: 1970 was the first year for the 1584ccm Beetle in North America. It was introduced to Western Europe in 1969.

VW Fact #666: "Beetles Revival" of Germany converted brand new Mexican-built 1584ccm Beetles for the European market between 1986 and 2004. Conversions included a Sedan, a Sunroof Sedan and a Convertible with either a 1584ccm or a larger 1800ccm engine.

VW Fact #667: The Brasilia was a local product of VW do Brasil sold in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa and Asia. It was produced from June 1973 until June 1982 and was launched under the leadership of Rudolf Leiding

VW Fact #668: From 1973 to 1982 a grand total 1,063,963 Brasilias were manufactured, of which merely 9,922 were Nigerian-built Igalas. The cars featured improved suspension with a rear-mounted, air-cooled 1584ccm Type 1 Beetle engine.

VW Fact #669: "Der Käfer: mehr bei einer Probefahrt" means "The Beetle: more by a test drive."

VW Fact #670: Brazilian Beetles retained the production of 1300 and 1500 engines until 1987.

VW Fact #671: Brazilian Bugs were unique in that they retained the smaller windows discontinued in Germany after 1964. They also adopted an entirely different dashboard, never seen in Europe or North America.

VW Fact #672: Volkswagen de Mexico boasts that 26 million rear-engined, air-cooled, boxer-motor VW brand Beetle Sedans have been built & sold since 1935, of which 1.7 million have come from the Puebla factory since 1954.

VW Fact #673: Mexico is the 3rd largest VW Beetle producer after Germany and Brazil, respectively.

VW Fact #674: The 411 was available with an 85hp W series engine for a very short period in the USA, only during the introductory period of April-October, 1971.

VW Fact #676: The VW Bus - T1 Microbus, T2 Bay Window, T3 Vanagon, T4 Eurovan and T5 Multivan is the second best selling truck line of all time after the Ford F-Series with over 14 million trucks built and sold to date.

VW Fact #677: In 1961, the Bavarian State Mint issued gold and silver medals with Dr. Heinz Nordhoff on one side and a Beetle on the other to commemorate production of the five millionth VW.

VW Fact #678: Due to US Treasury Dept. restrictions on the entry of gold into the country, only the silver commemorative medal, issued by the Bavarian State Mint to commemorate production of the five millionth VW, was available in the US.

VW Fact #679: Issued in 1961, the silver medal commemorating production of the five millionth VW cost was $5 and was suggested as a gift item for prominent customers, important business associates, and valued employees.

VW Fact #680: In the early 1960s, VW salesmen often generated new business prospects by driving around town snapping photos of road-weary cars. After checking the registration, they mailed a letter to the owner along with the picture and followed up two days later with a phone call.

VW Fact #681: Effective December 1, 1961, all convertible Beetles, Karmann Ghia coupes and Karmann Ghia convertibles with the anthracite color could be optionally fitted with red leatherette.

VW Fact #682: Effective December 1, 1961, all convertible Beetles, Karmann Ghia coupes and Karmann Ghia convertibles with the anthracite color could be optionally fitted with red leatherette.

VW Fact #683: VW made 3 major changes to the Service Booklets for 1962: it was wider, the word "Inspection" was dropped from the service coupons, and after the 6000 appointment the service interval was extended from 1500 to 3000 miles.

VW Fact #684: Beetles produced before Nov. 1 and Ghias before Aug. 1, 1961 had a worm-and-sector mechanism in the steering box. After, VW used a contour-threaded worm and a roller mounted in needle bearings to replace sliding friction with rolling friction.

VW Fact #685: Beetles produced before Nov. 1 and Ghias before Aug. 1, 1961 had a worm-and-sector mechanism in the steering box. After, VW used a contour-threaded worm and a roller mounted in needle bearings to replace sliding friction with rolling friction.

VW Fact #686: "Small World", a magazine for Volkswagen owners, debuted in April 1962.

VW Fact #687: Effective March 31, 1962, the office handling West Coast VWoA distributorships was moved from San Francisco, CA to Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

VW Fact #688: In February 1962, a huge storm and subsequent flood damaged 1,700 VWs awaiting export at the port in Hamburg. Cars that escaped severe damage were factory restored and sold as used cars in Germany.

VW Fact #689: In March 1962, the Dutch New Guinea post office issued a 25-cent stamp bearing the picture of a Volkswagen Transporter.

VW Fact #690: The VW Station Wagon had over 50% more loading space than conventional wagons.

VW Fact #691: The Karmann Ghia owed its streamlined body design to wind tunnel research.

VW Fact #692: Contoured seats and seat backs in the 1961 Karmann Ghia adjusted to 18 different positions.

VW Fact #693: Volkswagen's semi-unit construction was made up of a one-piece body bolted to a platform chassis.

VW Fact #694: Travel agencies, travel clubs at colleges, and local groups making charter flights to Europe were considered good sources for Tourist Delivery sales.

VW Fact #695: In 1962, it cost $25.50 less to purchase a VW Pick-up without gates for use as a flatbed.

VW Fact #696: The VW steering wheel was changed from three spokes to two spokes in 1949.

VW Fact #697: The head clearance of a 1962 Beetle's door frame was 53 inches.

VW Fact #698: Of all the companies in the world in 1962, Volkswagen ranked #1 in terms of employee ownership.

VW Fact #699: A butcher could load 1323 pounds of beef into a 1962 VW refrigerator van.

VW Fact #700: During March 1962, VWoA sold 16,622 passenger cars and 2,478 transporters.

VW Fact #701: VW's spring-loaded, self supporting front hood was first available on the 1962 Beetle.

VW Fact #702: In 1962, 2.5% of all cars in Vermont were VWs, 2.4% in New Hampshire, 2.2% in Oregon, .6% in North Dakota, and 4.5% in Alaska.

VW Fact #703: The "Bus Driver's Cap" was offered as a promotion at VW dealers beginning in 1962.

VW Fact #704: VWoA suggested five ways to promote campers in the summer of 1962: conversion kits, stage a cook-out, reciprocal displays with sporting goods stores, courtesy camper loans to sports columnists, and vacation promotions.

VW Fact #705: Volkswagen became the world's third ranking auto maker with total output of 1,007,113 vehicles in 1961, up 116,440 from 1960.

VW Fact #706: By the end of 1961, Volkswagenwerk and its subsidary and affiliated companies employed 80,874 people.

VW Fact #707: In 1961, the price of the VW Beetle increased by $30, while the Ghia coup and convertible were reduced by $141 and $154 respectively.

VW Fact #708: By the end of 1961 there were 1,483 VW dealers in Germany and 4,480 in foreign countries.

VW Fact #709: In 1961, 90% of exported VWs went to 20 countries; the rest was spread out over 110 countries.

VW Fact #710: By the end of 1961, 46% of all imported cars sold in the U.S. were Volkswagens and the number of VW dealers increased by 100.

VW Fact #711: In 1961 more than 100 miles of overhead conveyer lines were used in the VW factories in Germany.

VW Fact #712: Beginning in 1962, VWs were manufactured rather than assembled in Australia with much of the raw materials purchased from Australian suppliers.

VW Fact #713: To belong to the Quality Dealership Program, VW dealers had to: operate a well-managed dealership, show a good ratio of truck to passenger car sales, run a used car dept, have an adequate shop with efficient management, and stock replacement parts.

VW Fact #714: Starting in August 1962, labor unions at Wolfsburg agreed to work Saturdays, in part to help cut down waiting lists for the new 1200 model.

VW Fact #715: In 1972, the Seattle Police Dept ordered 200 copies of the VW brochure "What Year Is It" to help track down and identify stolen Beetles.

VW Fact #716: In 1973, two Norwegian ships chartered by Volkswagen, the Norse Variant and the Anita, arrived safely at American ports and unloaded their cargoes. Filled with coal for the return trip to Germany, more than 60 men and women died when the ships sank during a storm.

VW Fact #717: In February, 1963, US dealers sold a total of 22,745 vehicles, including 20,262 passenger cars and 2,483 trucks and wagons.

VW Fact #718: In February, 1963, US dealers sold 20,262 passenger cars.

VW Fact #719: In February, 1963, US dealers sold 2,483 trucks and station wagons.

VW Fact #720: In May, 1962, US dealers sold a total of 20,441 vehicles,
including 17,096 passenger cars and 3,345 trucks and wagons.

VW Fact #721: In May, 1962, US dealers sold 17,096 passenger cars.

VW Fact #722: In May, 1962, US dealers sold 3,345 trucks and station wagons.

VW Fact #723: On January 26, 1963, a dock strike on the US docks ended, releasing a backlog of VW vehicles that were in stasis in US ports and causing US dealers to have a stock of cars 80% higher than normal in the first 10-day period of February.

VW Fact #724: In 1962, more VWs were registered in the US than Studebakers, Lincolns, Renaults, Volvos, Mercedes, Triumphs, M.G.'s, and Porsches combined.

VW Fact #725: 1962 marked the sixth successive year that the VW-1200 was the most popular car in Sweden.

VW Fact #726: The VW 1500, introduced in Sweden in 1962, ranked seventh in overall vehicles sales by year end.

VW Fact #727: In 1962, 29,325 Beetles were sold in Sweden.

VW Fact #728: In 1961, 33,244 Beetles were sold in Sweden.

VW Fact #729: 1963 marked the import of the 300,000th VW into Sweden. As of 1963, Sweden was the largest export market next to the USA.

VW Fact #731: The one-millionth VW Bus was donated by Wolfsburg to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and joined it's 10,000 vehicle fleet.

VW Fact #732: During 1960-62, the Columba State-Record newspaper operated 5 Volkswagen Panels, which logged a total of over 40,000 miles with repair costs of 1.1c per mile.

VW Fact #733: By the end of 1963, the Columbia State-Record newspaper had expanded its fleet of Volkswagens to 28 vehicles, including 5 Panels marked with the paper's logo.

VW Fact #734: As of 1962, the average US VW dealer had 6 hoists in his dealership workshop.

VW Fact #735: By the end of 1962, total US VW dealership investment in buildings was over $12.5 million, compared with nearly $9.5 million at the end of 1961.

VW Fact #736: In April, 1963, US dealers sold a total of 25,232 vehicles, including 21,428 passenger cars and 3,804 trucks and wagons.

VW Fact #737: In April, 1963, US dealers sold 21,428 passenger cars.

VW Fact #738: In April, 1963, US dealers sold a total of 3,804 trucks and station wagons. 1,339 were 1200cc models and 2,465 1500cc were models.

VW Fact #739: From 1955-58, Ghia sales went from approx. 500 to 6,000 cars per year.

VW Fact #740: From 1958-62, Ghia sales doubled from 6,000 to 12,000 units per year.

VW Fact #741: In 1961 and 1962, 5,456 VW mechanics attended service training courses which included General Repair, Unit Repair, Electrical Repair, Service Manager, Service Advisor, and Shop Foreman.

VW Fact #742: At the 1963 New York automobile show, the Volkswagen exhibit centered around the cutaway "station wagon on a stick" that rotated above the head of spectators.

VW Fact #743: In 1963, Mr. Average VW Owner was 35 years old, earned $9,393, had a 68% likelihood of having attended college, and had a 62% chance that he was the head of a 2-car family.

VW Fact #744: VWoA advertising focused on a combination of 3 kinds of magazines: ones with mass circulation, ones that appealed to a select audience, and trade magazines.

VW Fact #745: VWoA magazine ads showed, through specific product features, why the VW was designed and made like it was, why it drove like it did, and how it felt to own one.

VW Fact #747: In May, 1963, US dealers sold 22,825 passenger cars.

VW Fact #748: In May, 1963, US dealers sold a total of 3,987 trucks and station wagons.

VW Fact #749: VWoA rebuilt 12,073 engines in 1962 through the VW factory in Kassel.

VW Fact #750: In the early 1960s, VW offered 3 basic dealership plans, all called for a non-supporting rear wall for future low-cost expansion of the workshop.

VW Fact #752: In the early 1960s, VW's standard plan for a medium dealership was 9,990 square feet with 10 workstalls, expandable to 15.

VW Fact #753: In the early 1960s, VW's standard plan for a large dealership was 13,417 square feet with 15 workstalls, expandable to 20.

VW Fact #754: In the early 1960s, VW's standard plan for dealerships called for modern furniture, bright colors, and use of natural grain wood in their sales offices.

VW Fact #755: In the early 1960s, VW's standard dealerships were in a L-shaped design to provide sufficient space for establishing VWs 3-point system of workflow and communications, e.g. between parts-service-service office and parts-cashier-customer.

VW Fact #756: Of the 330,000 issues of the Summer, 1963 Small World magazine mailed out, 285,000 issues included a return postcard for owner feedback.

VW Fact #757: In the early 1960s, the VWoA organization had 8 key departments: Public Relations, Merchandising, Sales Organization, Finance, Traffic, Personnel, Service, and Parts.

VW Fact #758: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Public Relations at VWoA were: Weathervane, Small World, News bureau, community relations, and special events: dealer tours, youth exchange program, and scholarship program

VW Fact #759: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Merchandising at VWoA were: Advertising, new and used vehicle merchandising, sales training, and sales promotion.

VW Fact #760: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Sales Organization at VWoA were: Field sales administration, business management, overseas delivery, new dealer development, sales correspondence, trademark matters, and product liability.

VW Fact #761: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Finance at VWoA were: Purchasing, accounting, and billing.

VW Fact #762: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Traffic at VWoA were: Ocean trasportation, import documentation and customs matters, inland transportation, and labeling.

VW Fact #763: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Personnel at VWoA were: Employee relations and employee group insurance administration.

VW Fact #764: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Service at VWoA were: Field service organization, warranty and Goodwill, customer correspondence, and service training.

VW Fact #765: In the early 1960s, the key departmental responsibilities under Parts at VWoA were: Distributor parts ordering, parts and accessories promotion, field parts organization, and parts training.

VW Fact #766: In 1963, the Johnson-Pacific company of Oakland, CA, sponsored a 200-mile rally through Northern CA for VW salesman and their wives to demonstrate the new 1500cc Bus engine.

VW Fact #767: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Horn now operated by thumb bar instead of ring.

VW Fact #768: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Leatherette upholstery porous, enabling air to circulate freely, does away with the vinyl "hot seat".

VW Fact #769: Changes for the 1964 model year included: 4 new colors - Panan Beige, Java Green, Bahama Blue, and Sea Blue.

VW Fact #770: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Continental tires now standard on all models.

VW Fact #771: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Recessed inside door handles, similar to the VW 1500.

VW Fact #772: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Sliding metal sunroof makes the fresh-air VW "theft-proof".

VW Fact #773: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Rear door now spring supported and 13 inches wider, opens from the inside or outside with the push of a button.

VW Fact #774: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Station Wagon and Kombi rear windows are now twice as large for better visibility.

VW Fact #775: Changes for the 1964 model year included: New headliners are all-vinyl, permitting quick and thorough cleaning.

VW Fact #776: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Knob-type plastic clotheshooks replace the metal hooks for safety.

VW Fact #777: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Larger brakes for all models, previously used on only the optional 1500cc models.

VW Fact #778: Changes for the 1964 model year included: Lockable compartment of all pickup trucks will now have a built-in hinge stay, which keeps the door in the open position, and released by simply pushing down on the door.

VW Fact #779: In 1963, Lil's General Stores purchased a 4-car fleet to determine whether their food store's 36 field representives would switch to Volkswagen in their 146 stores.

VW Fact #780: In 1963, International Auto Sales & Service distributor loaned a fleet of VW Transporters to doctors and nurses bringing the polio vaccine to shut-ins in New Orleans.

VW Fact #781: Beginning in Fall, 1963, VW dealers sold the Instant Heater, manufacturer by Stewart-Warner Corp.. Designed for VWs, this version provided thermostatically regulated heat, adjustable from 70F to 190F and consumed an average of 1/10 of a gallon per hour.

VW Fact #782: The suggested retail price for the 1964 edition of the Instant Heater, made by Stewart-Warner, was $49.50 for Beetle sedans, $54.50 for Ghias and Buses. Installation costs were not included.

VW Fact #783: As of 1963, VWoA registered 3 trademarks with the US Patent Office: The "VW" symbol in a vertical sequence surrounded by a circle, the letters "VW", and the word "Volkswagen" itself.

VW Fact #784: During the first quarter of 1963, VW factory lawyers handled 148 cases of trademark infringement.

VW Fact #785: In the early 1960s, VWoA recommended building principles suggested that new Dealers buy five square feet of land for every square foot of space occupied by the building. The extra land was to be landscaped and paved to accommodate parking.

VW Fact #786: In the early 1960s, World-Wide Automobiles Corp. supplied Dealers with fill-in news releases to promote safer, more economical motoring. These releases had the advantage of providing dealer publicity without appearing overly commercialized.

VW Fact #787: In 1960 when sales totaled 160,000 units, the ratio of used cars retailed to new car sales was .44 percent. By 1963, this ratio had increased to .6 percent out of 260,000 total units sold.

VW Fact #788: In 1963, Brundage Motors, with help from Western Union, created a new telegraph order form designed to reduce errors and cut down on long distance phone charges when ordering emergency parts.

VW Fact #789: In 1964, suggested list price for the new optional sliding door (M 161) for Panelvans was $85.

VW Fact #790: Truman Motors, a California dealership, boasted monthly sales in excess of $300,000 in 1963.

VW Fact #791: In 1963, the ten salesmen at Truman Motors, a California dealership, averaged $948 each in monthly commissions.

VW Fact #792: During 1962, Truman Motors, a California dealership, averaged one new commercial unit for every three new vehicles sold, and two used vehicles for each new unit merchandised. The average gross per used-unit retailed was $303.

VW Fact #793: In 1962, Truman Motors, a California dealership, spent $50 per used-unit retailed on advertising. Proportionate shares went to radio, television, and newspaper advertising.

VW Fact #794: During the first quarter of 1963, Truman Motors, a California dealership, spent $11,000 for newspaper advertising, $8,500 for radio and $8,000 for television advertising.

VW Fact #795: Dealers donated approximately 200 VW logo'd scoreboards to Little Leaguers in the Summer of 1963.

VW Fact #796: If all VWs sold from 1949 through mid-1963 were placed end to end, they would form a 2,853 mile line stretching from Seattle, WA to Miami, FL.

VW Fact #797: Ralph Cutright Co., a Santa Monica VW dealer, donated a rebuilt 1200 engine and a technical manual to the automotive instructor at Santa Monica High School in 1963.

VW Fact #798: To promote the new 1964 Beetle, VWoA suggested dealers should take "any old Volkswagen sedan (preferably a '54)", give it a quick repaint job, and display it next to the new year's model, to emphasize that most changes are on the inside.

VW Fact #799: As of 1963, VW factories in West Germany had about 110 miles of continuous flow conveyor lines, roughly the equivalent of the distance from the Indianapolis Speedway to Churchill Downs in Louisville.

VW Fact #800: Starting in January 1964, VWoA sponsored four prime-time television shows: The Perry Mason Show, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, and Rawhide, all on CBS, as well as the Richard Boone Anthology Series on NBC. The all-new commercials were exclusively for Sedans.

VW Fact #801: In the first quarter of 1964, VWoA spent over $1,600,000 on a network television advertising campaign.

VW Fact #802: From 1958 to 1962, VWoA advertising campaigns won 49 awards - 14 for magazine ads, 13 for TV, 10 for outdoor posters, 7 for catalogs and brochures, and 5 for other categories.

VW Fact #803: In 1963, each specially designed ship used to transport the VW fleet held approximately 1,750 vehicles and provided work for approximately 75 men. This represented about 36,000 man-hours and $130,000 in salaries annually.

VW Fact #804: Volkswagens swept the 1963 Tour D'Europe, a 9,320 mile reliability trial around the Mediterranean. The 1500s took the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 7th places. The 1200s finished 2nd, 3rd, and 5th in their respective class.

VW Fact #805: Lake Charles, LA was officially opened as a Port of Entry for Volkswagen on October 23, 1963. Located 240 miles west of New Orleans, Lake Charles welcomed VW destined for Mid-America Cars, the distributor for MO, KS, AR, and NB.

VW Fact #806: Hansen-MacPhee Engineering Co., Inc, New England distributor, sponsored all 150 Bruins hockey and Celtics basketball games during the fall and winter of 1963-64.


VW Fact #808: The average American VW dealership sold approximately $110,000 worth of parts and accessories in 1964, comprising nearly 40% of its yearly dollar volume.

VW Fact #809: The 1964 VW car-care kit contained liquid cleaner, liquid polish, chrome protector, touch-up paint, a soft polishing cloth, upholstery cleaner, and a windshield washer de-icer.

VW Fact #811: Changes for the 1965 model year included more contoured back for front seats, a hinged back seat that converts the rear of the car to a level platform, and swivel-mounted sunvisors.

VW Fact #812: Changes for the 1965 model year included replacing the T-type handle with a push-button type.

VW Fact #813: Changes for the 1965 model year included a redesigned jack with two lever points, one for raising, one for lowering.

VW Fact #814: Changes for the 1965 model year included a higher and wider windshield and an enlarged rear window.

VW Fact #815: In 1964, Goodyear began supplying Volkswagenwerk with more than 400,000 American-made tires per year. The tires were exported from New Orleans, shipped Wolfsburg, fitted to VWs on the assembly line, and then imported with the new car.

VW Fact #817: By 1966 VWoA had imported over 2 million VWs to the U.S. and had 14 distributors and over 900 authorized dealerships.

VW Fact #818: On August 25th, 1959 the three millionth VW, a red Deluxe Sedan, rolled off the assembly lines in Wolfsburg

VW Fact #819: On August 25th, 1959 the 500,000th VW Transporter left the Hannover factory.

VW Fact #820: On August 5th, 1955 Wolfsburg turned out the millionth VW to be built since 1945.

VW Fact #821: The two millionth VW left the factory on December 28th, 1957.

VW Fact #822: In 1959, a new VW rolled off the final assembly lines every 19 seconds.

VW Fact #823: In 1959, the Cuban telephone company placed an order for 140 Volkswagens through importer Autos Volkswagen de Cuba S.A.

VW Fact #824: In June 1959, VWs took 1st and 2nd place in Australia's 1200 mile Ampol Tasmanian Trial. Tarred surfaces alternated with icy and snowy stretches of road, and mud up to 1 foot deep in places.

VW Fact #825: Volkswagens were overall winners in the 1959 Caltrex Round-Rhodesia Rally, a stiff reliability test held in East Africa, covering 1500 miles through Rhodesia, Mozambique, and Nyassaland.

VW Fact #826: VW Dealers scored a record breaking year in 1968 with 569,292 new units sold, 28.4% ahead of the number of new VWs sold in 1967.

VW Fact #827: 1968 sales of Type 2 vehicles increased 48.2% over 1967, with dealers delivering 50,756 new Buses and Trucks.

VW Fact #828: Type 3 sales in 1968 increased 37.9% over 1967's numbers.

VW Fact #829: Type 1 sales in 1968 increased 24.4% over 1967's numbers.

VW Fact #830: Beginning with December 1968 production, all Karmann Ghia convertibles were equipped with a glass rear window that folded down under the convertible top.

VW Fact #831: Beginning with January 1969 production, the brake and clutch pedals on all standard transmission Type 1 and Type 3 vehicles were moved 4/10" to the left, increasing the space between the gas and brake pedal.

VW Fact #832: Beginning with January 1969 production, the brake and clutch pedals on all standard transmission Type 1 and Type 3 vehicles were moved 4/10" to the left, increasing the space between the gas and brake pedal.

VW Fact #833: Beginning at the end of February 1969, all models were equipped with a new odometer that showed tenths of a mile.

VW Fact #834: In 1969, the Republic of Dahomey in West Africa issued four postage stamps featuring Type 2 VWs in use as a mail van, a railroad station shuttle bus, in front of a ferry, and travelling along a road. They ranged in denomination from 30 to 70 francs.

VW Fact #835: In 1968, two VW innovations, not company sponsored, appeared on the American auto scene - the Dune Buggy (comprised of a cut-down VW chassis and a fiberglass body) and an Electric VW Bus.

VW Fact #836: In 1968, two VW innovations, not company sponsored, appeared on the American auto scene - the Dune Buggy (comprised of a cut-down VW chassis and a fiberglass body) and an Electric VW Bus.

VW Fact #837: To ease the world "money crisis" Germany put a 4% tax on exports in 1968. VW prices were increased 2.9%, making the sedan suggested retail price $1,799.

VW Fact #838: Introduced in April 1969, the Ford Maverick was the first of the domestic small cars developed to compete with Volkswagens.

VW Fact #839: In late 1969, VW's Research and Development Center in Wolfsburg tested experimental nitrogen-filled driver side "air bags" in Bugs.

VW Fact #840: Volkswagen South Atlantic Distributor initiated a "mystery shopper" program in March 1969. To win the $100 prize, salesmen were scored on a checklist of more than 50 items.

VW Fact #841: U.S. dealers sold 14,990 Tourist Delivery Program VWs in 1969, an 18% increase over the total cars sold in 1968.

VW Fact #842: Wes Behel Volkswagen in Sunnyvale CA loaned six 1970 Bugs to the Fremont Union High School District for their driver education program.

VW Fact #843: The L.H. Strong Motor Company in Salt Lake City Utah loaned six 1970 Bugs to the Granite School District for their High School driver education program.

VW Fact #844: The four millionth VW for the United States market, a red Beetle, arrived in the Port of New York on February 2nd, 1970.

VW Fact #845: One of the many VW innovations: Two seat belt mounting points for each front seat - 1962.

VW Fact #846: One of the many VW innovations: Lap belt for the front seats and mounting points for back seat lap belts - 1967.

VW Fact #847: One of the many VW innovations: Front seat lap/shoulder belts and lap belts for rear seats with mounting points for shoulder belts - 1968.

VW Fact #848: One of the many VW innovations: Plastic headlining - 1963.

VW Fact #849: One of the many VW innovations: Optional sunroof - 1950.

VW Fact #850: One of the many VW innovations: Padded sun visor - 1960.

VW Fact #851: One of the many VW innovations: Two-speed windshield wipers - 1966 Type 2.

VW Fact #852: One of the many VW innovations: Reverse lights - 1967.

VW Fact #853: One of the many VW innovations: Steering/ignition lock - 1969.

VW Fact #854: One of the many VW innovations: Four-way flasher - 1963 Type 2.

VW Fact #855: One of the many VW innovations: Plastic battery - 1967.

VW Fact #856: One of the many VW innovations: Sidemarker lights - 1961.

VW Fact #857: One of the many VW innovations: Rear window de-fogger - 1958 Karman Ghia.

VW Fact #858: One of the many VW innovations: Disc brakes - 1966 Type 3

VW Fact #859: One of the many VW innovations: Dual circuit brakes - 1967.

VW Fact #860: One of the many VW innovations: Transparent brake fluid reservoir - 1961.

VW Fact #861: One of the many VW innovations: Electronically-controlled carburetor jet - 1966..

VW Fact #863: One of the many VW innovations: Electronic fuel injection - 1968 Type 3.

VW Fact #864: One of the many VW innovations: Dual exhausts - 1956.

VW Fact #865: One of the many VW innovations: Progressive valve springs - 1962.

VW Fact #867: One of the many VW innovations: Recessed steering wheel - 1960.

VW Fact #868: One of the many VW innovations: Backrest locks - 1966.

VW Fact #869: One of the many VW innovations: Windshield washer - 1961.

VW Fact #870: One of the many VW innovations: Diaphram type clutch - 1965 Type 3.

VW Fact #871: One of the many VW innovations: No break-in driving - 1954.

VW Fact #872: One of the many VW innovations: Back seat heater outlets - 1963.

VW Fact #873: One of the many VW innovations: Glass rear window in convertible - 1949.

VW Fact #874: One of the many VW innovations: Dashboard grip - 1954 Model 151.

VW Fact #875: One of the many VW innovations: Unitized construction - 1950 Type 2.

VW Fact #876: One of the many VW innovations: Padded convertible top - 1949 Type 1.

VW Fact #877: One of the many VW innovations: Flexible glass - 1966 Type 3.

VW Fact #878: Popular VW accessory: In 1969, more than 21 sets of Taper Tips were sold for every 100 new VWs delivered in the U.S.

VW Fact #879: Popular VW accessory: 27% of all Type 1 and Type 3 buyers ordered Gravel Guards in 1969.

VW Fact #880: Popular VW accessory: 27% of all Type 1 and Type 3 buyers ordered Gravel Guards in 1969.

VW Fact #881: Popular VW accessory: 26% of all Type 1 buyers added overriders to their new car in 1969.

VW Fact #882: Between January and April 1970, the most popular Beetle color was Yukon Yellow, followed by Savannah Beige, Diamond Blue, Royal Red, Elm Green, Cobalt Blue, and Pastel White in that order.

VW Fact #883: Between January and April 1970, the most popular Karman Ghia color was Pampas Yellow, followed by Amber, Bahia Red, Pastel Blue, Irish Green, Albert Blue, and Ivory in that order.

VW Fact #884: Between January and April 1970, the most popular Squareback color was Savannah Beige, followed by Diamond Blue, Clementine, Royal Red, Elm Green, Cobalt Blue, and Pastel White in that order.

VW Fact #885: Between January and April 1970, the most popular Fastback color was Clementine, followed by Savannah Beige, Diamond Blue, Deep-Sea Green, Royal Red, Cobalt Blue, and Pastel White in that order.

VW Fact #886: In 1972, Volkswagenwerk AG purchased $14 million worth of computers for its Wolfsburg R&D Center, with a total storage capacity of up to 154,000,000 characters.

VW Fact #887: Army specialist fourth class Anthony Gray, an auto parts salesman for Moore Motors in Philadelphia PA, received the Purple Heart and the Silver Star for bravery in a 1966 battle in the La Drang Valley near the Cambodian border.

VW Fact #888: In response to customer demand, VW started the "Glitterbug" program in 1969. Glitterbugs were available in a palette of 24 body colors, six patterns of trim tape in four different colors, and four roof paints.

VW Fact #889: Individualized showpiece "Glitterbugs" were available in 24 body colors, half of which were metallic hues ranging from White Glitter to Purple and Jade Glitter. Non-metallic colors included Green Glow, Lavender Glow, and Royal Glow.

VW Fact #890: Individualized showpiece "Glitterbugs" came with color co-ordinated spray-on roof paint which simulated the texture of vinyl. The four available colors were black, olive, white and dark blue.

VW Fact #891: Individualized showpiece "Glitterbugs" could be customized by unique tape designs in black, red, white, and silver, with names like "Monza Curve", "Monaco Patch", and "Nurburgring C", their names borrowed from the world's most famous race circuits.

VW Fact #892: To comply with federal regulations, VWs had a 10 digit serial number starting at the 1970 model year. The first two digits signify model, the third is the last number of the model year, and the fourth to tenth digits indicate consecutive production number within each type.

VW Fact #893: The 18th million Beetle rolled off the assembly lines in September, 1974.

VW Fact #894: VW introduced front-engine, water-cooled cars because it was easier to meet stringent exhaust emission standards with a water-cooled engine.

VW Fact #895: VW introduced front-engine, water-cooled cars because a water-cooled, front engine line expands the VW market potential to include people who have always wanted VW quality and economy but prefer a water-cooled car.

VW Fact #896: In 1973, 42,756 VW Buses were sold in America, outselling Mercedes, Saab, and Subaru.

VW Fact #897: As of 1974, the VW Beetle was sold in more than 160 countries.

VW Fact #898: The first Beetle obituary was in 1957 in Automotive News, the automotive trade paper. It asked Midnight Near for Volkswagen? and stated the endof a 20-year old car is close at hand.

VW Fact #899: During 1962, Volkswagenwerk exported 627,613 vehicles to more than 130 countries.
« Siste redigering: januar 23, 2023, 20:19:32 pm av Endre S » Loggført

1974 1303 SilverBIGL
1971 1302 Cab
1963 Type 311
1967 Type 365 Squareback
X
1962 Type 343 Ghia 
1957 Type 111 (T111) 
1964 Type 311    
Type 1 are nice, Type 2 are cool, BUT Everyone knows, that  Type 3............RULE!\\\\\\\" 

LOBO
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« Svar #2 på: desember 02, 2012, 17:39:14 pm »

Synes det var litt knapt jeg Gliser Du har ikke flere?
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D e ikkje rust der d e hull... bare rundt kanten d!
Endre S
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« Svar #3 på: desember 02, 2012, 18:00:25 pm »

Det er noen hull her og der så bruker nok litt tid i vinter på å tette de da det ikkje er så mange rusthull å tette lenger..... ;-)
Loggført

1974 1303 SilverBIGL
1971 1302 Cab
1963 Type 311
1967 Type 365 Squareback
X
1962 Type 343 Ghia 
1957 Type 111 (T111) 
1964 Type 311    
Type 1 are nice, Type 2 are cool, BUT Everyone knows, that  Type 3............RULE!\\\\\\\" 

Endre S
Supermedlem
*****
Innlegg: 2093
Bosted: Rogaland


Våre liv er summen av de valg vi har tatt.


Vis profil WWW
« Svar #4 på: februar 15, 2020, 18:30:14 pm »

VW Fact #900: Volkswagen Canada paid the Canadian government more than $66 million in sales taxes between 1952 and 1962.

VW Fact #901: In 1962, Volkswagen Canada purchased an Elliott 5500 Addressing Machine to speed up bulk mailing. It clicked off addresses at the rate of 6,000 per hour.

VW Fact #902: As of 1962, there were an estimated 650 VW dealerships in the USA.

VW Fact #903: As of 1957, there were 350 dealerships in the USA.

VW Fact #904: The 40-horsepower engine in the 1962 Volkswagens is 33 percent more powerful than the engines used in the 1946 models.

VW Fact #905: On March 9, 1962, Riviera Motors of Portland, OR became distributor for the combined states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington following its purchase of the Seattle Volkswagen distributor franchise.

VW Fact #906: The VW steering wheel was changed from three spokes to two spokes in June of 1949.

VW Fact #907: In January, 1962, Volkswagens accounted for 60 percent of all imported car registrations in the USA.

VW Fact #908: In February, 1962, VW Dealers sold 14,205 cars.

VW Fact #909: Brundage Motors, distributor for Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina received 12 cars during its first year of business in 1953.

VW Fact #910: Brundage Motors, distributor for Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina received its 50,000th car for distribution during 1962.

VW Fact #912: In Australia, The Beetle was assembled in a former railway workshop in Clayton, Melbourne, Australia, from German made CKD kits from 1954 to 1959. From 1959 it was fully Australian-manufactured, with local content reaching 85% by 1967. Assembly of German CKD kits resumed in 1968 and continued until the last Australian Beetle was assembled in July 1967.

VW Fact #913: Australian-made VW's were exported to New Zealand, Fiji, Malaysia, New Caledonia, Indonesia, Philippines, Western Samoa and other South Pacific islands. A factory in Auckland (New Zealand) also assembled Australian-made CKD kits in the early 1960's. 1,000 kits being shipped to New Zealand in 1963 and over 2,000 kits in 1964.

VW Fact #914: The first and second generation Transporters were also locally assembled in Clayton, Melbourne, Australia, as were the Type 3 Squareback, Notchback and Fastback models. After 1974 Volkswagen Australia also locally assembled the Passat, and from 1976 the Golf.

VW Fact #916: The Australian Volkswagen factory was the first VW factory, outside of Wolfsburg, to possess a master body jig. In the 1960's VW's Melbourne plant had the best quality control centre in Australia. The master body jig was sent to Brazil in 1969; Brazilian Beetles used the Australian "small window" body shell until their production ended in 1993.

VW Fact #917: VW's Australian popularity was built on its outstanding successes in the Round Australia Reliability trials of the day. Volkswagens won the 1955 Redex Trial, the 1956 Mobilgas Trial, the 1957 Ampol and 1957 Mobilgas Trials and the 1958 Mobilgas Trial against much larger and more powerful cars. VW's often filled the minor placings as well. In the 1957 Mobilgas Trial, Volkswagen finished 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th. VW's dominance was the reason these trials were discontinued.

VW Fact #918: In 1958-59-60-61, Volkswagen was the third-best selling make in Australia, beating BMC and Chrysler, and behind only Holden and Ford. In 1960, the Beetle was Australia's second-best selling individual car model of any kind, behind only the Holden.

VW Fact #919: From debut in 1954 until 1962, VW only sold the 'Deluxe' Beetle in Australia, which was the equivalent to the German 'Export' model. In August 1962 VW Australia introduced the 'Standard' Beetle to sell at a cheaper price alongside the Deluxe. Australians called it the 'Austerity' model. In 1967 it was renamed the 'Custom' Beetle, and was discontinued in 1968.

VW Fact #920: An Australian-built 1962 1/2 Ruby-red 1200 Deluxe Beetle became the first production car to visit Antarctica, when Ray McMahon of ANARE shipped 'Antarctica 1' to Australia's Mawson scientific base in 1963. The VW was there for a year and survived an Antarctic winter, starting and running in temperatures as low as -50 deg. Celcius. On its return to Australia it was entered in the 1964 BP Rally. Driven by Ray Christie, 'Antarctica 1' won the event outright. Unfortunately this car was scrapped in the late 1960's.

VW Fact #921: A second VW 'Antarctica 2', replaced 'Antarctica 1' at Mawson in 1964. This second car, a 1964 model painted International Orange, spent 5 years in Antarctica. On its return, it spent a number of years in the early 1970's as a racecar in the Firestone Rallycross series at Catalina near Katoomba in the Blue Mountains, West of Sydney, driven by Chris Heyer and Ed Mulligan. This car survived until the early 1980's but was also sadly scrapped.

VW Fact #922: 1964 was VW's best-ever sales year in Australia (so far), with 31,419 sales, comprised of 22,293 VW 1200's, 3,443 VW 1500's, 28 Karmann Ghias and 5,655 Transporters.

VW Fact #923: The only Australian-designed Volkswagen was the 1968 Country Buggy. It was not a sales success, as only 1,956 were made, but the survivors are very collectable today. The Country Buggy provided some inspiration for the later German-designed Type 181 'Thing'.

VW Fact #925: The 1966 fully-imported VW1600TS Fastback, with 65-bhp (SAE), was capable of 140km/h and is the fastest air-cooled Volkswagen officially sold in Australia.

VW Fact #926: Australia is the only country in the world where the Type 3 was sold as the 'VW Type 3'. Initially the European 'VW 1500' nametag was used, while the USA used the Squareback and Fastback names. In 1970 the facelifted range was renamed to the 'VW Type 3', and the Australian-made 'Type 3' badges fitted to the front mudguards are unique in the world.

VW Fact #927: Due to local production, a full range and out hot and dry climate, more VW Type 3 models survive in Australia than any country in the world.

VW Fact #928: In 1964 there were 290 Volkswagen dealers in Australia, including 29 in Sydney. Today there are nine Sydney VW dealers, none of which were around in the air-cooled era. The oldest VW dealer is Chatswood Classic Cars, which began in 1989.

VW Fact #929: Volkswagen sold more Kombis in Australia in 1975 (8,974) than Toyota sold Hiaces in 2007.

VW Fact #930: The Australian-made 'Sopru' Kombi Campmobile is the largest-selling campervan in Australia of all makers. Over 12,000 were sold between 1969 and 1979.

VW Fact #931: In Australia, The Beetle was not sold as the Beetle throughout most of its life. Initially it was called the VW 1200, which became the VW 1300 in 1966 and the VW 1500 in 1968. In 1971 there was the 1600 Superbug S and the 1300 Bug, and in 1974 the 1600 Superbug L. The 1976 model, the last one, WAS finally officially sold as the Beetle by Volkswagen Australia.

VW Fact #932: 1987 was Volkswagens worst-ever sales year in Australia. Only 48 Transporters were sold.

VW Fact #933: During the 1970's, the Wolfsburg plant could produce a new Beetle every 8 seconds. Today, a Golf or Jetta comes off the line every 12 seconds

VW Fact #934: VW Beetles were made of two different thicknesses of sheet steel. The body shell and mudguards were stamped in 0.88mm sheet steel, while the bonnets and doors were slightly thinner at 0.75mm

VW Fact #936: At the end of 1962, 1,800 distributors, dealers, and wives gathered in New York City for the first VW national organization meeting and dedication of VWoA's new headquarters.

VW Fact #937: In 1962, Ford Motor Company decided not to bring its Cardinal model "Taunus" to the American market, leaving VW in a stronger competitive position for 1963.

VW Fact #938: Winners of the "Quality Dealer Program" were based on the dealer's civic activities, high standard of business ethics, successful sales and business management, service facilities, personnel policies, and ethical advertising.

VW Fact #939: The 1962 dockworkers strike which tied up Atlantic and Gulf Coast shipping left 10 vessels with 6525 VWs anchored off coast. 12 vessels with a total of 8695 cars were successfully unloaded between noon December 21st and the strike deadline at 5pm December 23rd.

VW Fact #940: The redline disappeared from the VW speedometer in 1961.

VW Fact #941: The VW synchromesh transmission was built in Kassel, Germany.

VW Fact #944: In early 1963, Midwestern VW in Columbus Ohio moved its used car operation to a larger, corner property lot with a two-bay reconditioning shop and display space for 75 automobiles.

VW Fact #945: Fred Kling (of Kling Motors in Canton Ohio) became a dealer in 1956 after owning a VW for two years. He sold his first cars working out of a converted hardware store.

VW Fact #947: Capitol Car Distributors marked the arrival of its 50,000th VW through the Port of Baltimore in 1962. It was delivered through Forty-West Motors to Miss Margaret Chapman, a school teacher.


VW Fact #948: In 1962, Inter-Continental Motors of San Antonio TX marked the arrival of its 50,000th VW through the Port of Houston. It was transported on the Norwegian ship "Ferder".

VW Fact #949: In December 1961, Jim McGlone Motors of Croton-on-Hudson NY, rented nine reconditioned panelvans to the local post office for holiday mail deliveries.

VW Fact #950: After testing a walk-thru panelvan from Jim McGlone Motors on a rough delivery route in 1962, the New York grocery chain Gristede's converted their entire 120 vehicle fleet to Volkswagens. Selling points included ease of loading from the driver's seat and exterior locking to discourage thieves.

VW Fact #952: In 1962, Truman Motors of El Cajon California, sponsored a 250-mile economy run. The winner, Ed Van Fleet, averaged 58.6 mpg in his Beetle.

VW Fact #953: In the early 1960s, VWoA used 4 specific direct mailing pieces to target small businesses such as dry cleaners and laundries (who bought 10% of all panel models), plumbing and heating repair, TV/radio repair, druggists, grocers, and liquor dealers.

VW Fact #954: In the early 1960s, VWoA used 3 specific direct mailing pieces to target farmers. One showed all the trucks, one told the parts story, and the third highlighted truck economy.

VW Fact #955: In the early 1960s, VWoA used 4 specific direct mailing pieces to target the nearly 3 million non-fleet small business owners who operated up to four trucks.

VW Fact #957: In 1963, VWoA authorized the design of Little League scoreboards for dealers to donate to their local teams. Each scoreboard had a VW-blue background with white lettering, VW logo, and space for a dealer imprint. Boards cost $195 + $8.50 for dealer imprint.

VW Fact #958: Some 1963 headliners had black dots instead of perforated holes on the side edging and first forward panel to prevent padding from showing through.

VW Fact #960: Total VW export during 1962 was 681,319 vehicles, 57.5% of the company's production.

VW Fact #961: In 1962, the 685 authorized VW U.S. dealers sold one of every two vehicles imported into the US

VW Fact #962: By the end of 1962, one of every two passenger cars produced in West Germany was a Volkswagen.

VW Fact #963: VW produced about 5,000 vehicles daily in 1962: 3,300 passenger cars, 700 trucks and Buses, and 1,000 type 3s.

VW Fact #966: In 1963, VW dealers in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut marketed the Standard Westphalia Camper to the "weekend outdoorsman" fisherman and hunter. Two employees demonstrated how to remove the conversion equipment in just 2 minutes, 11 seconds, transforming it to the bare 221 model.

VW Fact #967: In the early 1960s, VW salesmen used Industry Profiles, written by the editors of leading trade magazines, to survey each industry that used light trucks, including what the business owners looked for and needed in a truck and any issues they faced.

VW Fact #969: The Wolfsburg plant took a five day advanced vacation in February 1963 to give ships waiting at U.S. ports time to unload after the backup caused by the dockworkers strike. The five days were debited against the factory's standard 3 week vacation.

VW Fact #970: Debuting in 1963, the programmed Product Knowledge manual taught salesman product knowledge as it related to owner benefits. Information about VW Transporters was broken down into frames of information, which were then put into sequence for rapid learning.

VW Fact #971: Nearly 10,000 attendees of the 1962 Louisiana State Fair registered for the give-away TV set from the VW exhibit. Stubs were forwarded to appropriate local VW dealers where busy salesmen started phoning all those new prospects.

VW Fact #972: Over 2500 tired Christmas shoppers took advantage of free rides on one of four Buses provided by Foreig

VW Fact #975: In 1962 it took about 10 hours to move a ship carrying 1000 Volkswagens into berth, unload it, and move it out again.

VW Fact #977: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #1 was "Has the service department left the car immaculate: has the pre-delivery inspection been thoroughly completed?"

VW Fact #978: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #2 was "Point out the lights on the dashboard; what their colors mean. The colors of the dash lights in a VW have a different significance from the ones on domestic autos."

VW Fact #979: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #3 was "Show how to adjust the seats and seat-backs."

VW Fact #980: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #4 was "Demonstrate the operation of the non-repeat ignition switch."

VW Fact #981: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #5 was "Show how the VW is shifted into reverse. (And into first, second, third, and fourth.)"

VW Fact #982: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #6 was "Demonstrate how the sunroof opens and closes; the convertible top."

VW Fact #983: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #7 was "Lower the rear seat back and show how to get at the luggage space."

VW Fact #984: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #8 was "Locate the battery and fuse box."

VW Fact #985: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #9 was "Raise the hood and point out windshield washer and brake fluid reservoirs."

VW Fact #987: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #11 was "Acquaint the customer with the owner's manual and how an understanding of its contents will bring greater driving pleasure and economy."

VW Fact #988: In 1963, New Car Delivery Checklist item #12 was "Follow-up a week or so after delivery and ask how he likes his VW."

VW Fact #990: Gibbes Machinery Company, a VW dealer in Columbia, South Carolina, had a postage meter identification slug which carried the message "2 names you can trust, Gibbes--Volkswagen".

VW Fact #991: In May 1959, Schumacher Auto Sales of Yonkers, New York sold three panelvans to Riverdale Meat Company. In December 1961 the company traded the VWs for two Corvans. By September 1962 they returned their business to Schumacher, praising the VW for its superiority.

VW Fact #992: VWoA's customer relations magazine "Small World" debuted in Spring 1962 and circulation grew to 343,146 within 1 year.

VW Fact #995: In the early 1960's, VW dealers used the "instant sign kit" to promote their dealership on the side of panelvans. The kit, made up of 12 color, pressure sensitive, adhesive backed stickers, one for each VW model, was available for $13.35 each.

VW Fact #996: On February 1st, 1963, VW introduced upholstery cleaner to it's factory approved line of parts and accessories. The cleaner was recommended for both cloth and vinyl fabrics.

VW Fact #997: VW dealers were encouraged to increase the sale of car-care items by creating kits made up of windshield washer fluid, car polish, upholstery cleaner, and a touch up stick. They often included a large sponge to make the kit even more attractive.

VW Fact #1000: Prototypes of the new 1500 transporters were road tested over a grueling 9000 mile trail from New York to Mexico and back. The test included a week long 24 hour a day, stop-and-go, city traffic test in New York City.

VW Fact #1001: When marketing the new 1500 transporter, salesmen used exterior decals to identify demonstrator vehicles. They included dotted lines around the big double doors, lettering over the rear wheel well highlighting "24-mile-per-gallon" and the high ground clearance, and lettering on the engine compartment's beefier 1500 cc.

VW Fact #1002: When marketing the new 1500 transporter, salesmen used interior decals to identify demonstrator vehicles. Ten VW salespoints were presented, including the 1,800 pound load capacity, 170 cubic feet of cargo space, and the unitized steel body.

VW Fact #1003: The Thing, introduced to American dealerships in Spring 1973, was assembled at the VW factory in Puebla, Mexico.

VW Fact #1004: The Thing, powered by a Super Beetle engine, had removable doors, a fold down windshield, and detachable convertible top and side curtains.

VW Fact #1005: The rear axle ratio on the Thing was higher than the Beetle's, enabling it to keep going when the going got tough.

VW Fact #1007: Initially, the Thing was available in three colors: white, yellow, and red. All had black leatherette interiors and black tops.

VW Fact #1008: The Thing was first shown publicly at the Frankfurt Auto Show in Germany in 1969.

VW Fact #1011: In 1973, two Norwegian ships chartered by Volkswagen, the "Norse Variant" and the "Anita", sunk on the return trip to Germany. 60 lives were lost, one man was rescued.

VW Fact #1014: In 1973, Cars Incorporated of Jacksonville, North Carolina, donated a Bus to the nearby fire department, Township Six. The VW Bus carried a resuscitator, fire axes, shovels, grass fire flappers, and fire extinguishers.

VW Fact #1015: In 1973, the Nigerian VW importer donated two GT's to the Lagos city council. The GT's, built on Type 2 pick-up bodies, were used as garbage trucks.

VW Fact #1016: In 1973, an avid Ohio fisherman turned his 1951 Bug into an ice shanty. He removed the back end, cut holes in the floorboard, added a metal smokestack, and carried planks for crossing cracks in the lake ice.

VW Fact #1018: Cape Volkswagen in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, suffered flash flood damage in the summer of 1973. They lost 26 new cars and 80 used cars, suffered $100,000 in damages, and had four inches of water in the showroom.

VW Fact #1019: In 1973, a 1958 Beetle, nicknamed "Yellow Submarine" crossed the 32 miles of sea from Ireland to Britain in seven hours, 15 minutes. The Bug was equipped with a propeller, extra fuel tanks, and special sealing.

VW Fact #1020: In 1973, a 97-year-old man from Liverpool, Ohio, settled in Hot Springs, Arkansas in his newly purchased VW Campmobile. Unable to drive himself anymore, the retired railroad engineer planned to hire a chauffeur.

VW Fact #1021: It took 13 years to build the first million VWs in Brazil, but only three years for the second million.

VW Fact #1022: In 1957 VW do Brasil had 796 employees, by 1973 the work force was more than 30,000.

VW Fact #1024: At the 1963 New York automobile show, the Volkswagen exhibit had a Beetle Sedan elevated at the rear so that the windshield was vertical with a small hole drilled through the windshield. About 10 feet in front was a candle burning in a holder. When the door was closed a puff of air through the hole would snuff out the candle. If a vent wing or window was open, this did not occur. This showed the VWs "air tightness" and the fact that the doors did close easier if you opened the vent wing.

VW Fact #1025: 1969 was the first year that US Volkswagen dealer sales failed to increase. This was due to an East and Gulf Coast dock strike that prevented the flow of new VWs to 3/4 of US dealerships for three months.

VW Fact #1026: Although the Karmann Ghia was VWs lowest-volume car, it outranked most imported cars sold in the US during 1970.

VW Fact #1027: St. Lucie Motors Inc. in Fort Pierce, Florida, featured a piano and guitar in the waiting room for use by customers having their VWs serviced.

VW Fact #1028: In 1970, two 411s proved their durability by completing Belgium's four day, four night "Marathon de la Route". Fewer than 40% of entrants lasted through the gruelling 96 hour event.

VW Fact #1030: Between 1965 and 1966, the total United States Volkswagen sales increased 18%.

VW Fact #1032: In 1966, the Executive Vice-President of Volkswagen Atlantic had the F.B.I. investigate the employee who contributed "Edsel Echo" to the contest to name the organization's new dealer magazine.

VW Fact #1033: In 1960, Volkswagen Atlantic purchased for its new headquarters site a former marble quarry which had been turned into a sanitary landfill.

VW Fact #1034: Between 1967 and 1968, the total United States Volkswagen sales increased 22%.

VW Fact #1036: In early 1970, Volkswagen Atlantic completed a new $5 million headquarters on 31 acres in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

VW Fact #1037: In 1970, Volkswagen introduced the "Glitterbug" program where buyers could customize their Beetles from a palette of 24 metallic hued body colors, 6 trim tape pattern in 4 different colors, and 4 roof colors. Over 9,000 different combinations were possible.

VW Fact #1038: On November 1st, 1970, Volkswagen added Audi and Porsche to its product line through a network of separate franchised dealers.
« Siste redigering: januar 19, 2023, 20:49:46 pm av Endre S » Loggført

1974 1303 SilverBIGL
1971 1302 Cab
1963 Type 311
1967 Type 365 Squareback
X
1962 Type 343 Ghia 
1957 Type 111 (T111) 
1964 Type 311    
Type 1 are nice, Type 2 are cool, BUT Everyone knows, that  Type 3............RULE!\\\\\\\" 

ted67
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« Svar #5 på: februar 15, 2020, 19:03:49 pm »

Jeg er ikke Så glad i å lese på fremmedspråk, mulig å få det på norsk??
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Endre S
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« Svar #6 på: februar 15, 2020, 20:06:20 pm »

Man kan ikkje være glad i alt :-/
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1974 1303 SilverBIGL
1971 1302 Cab
1963 Type 311
1967 Type 365 Squareback
X
1962 Type 343 Ghia 
1957 Type 111 (T111) 
1964 Type 311    
Type 1 are nice, Type 2 are cool, BUT Everyone knows, that  Type 3............RULE!\\\\\\\" 

ted67
Seniormedlem
****
Innlegg: 475
Bosted: kolsås


Kicking ass and taking names since 1999.


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« Svar #7 på: februar 15, 2020, 22:39:26 pm »

 Øyerulling Dårlig ass!!  Blunker
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SveinT
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« Svar #8 på: februar 16, 2020, 09:27:53 am »

Alt er jo mulig, men jeg tar ikke noe ansvar for riktigheten i oversettelsene  Osteaktig
https://translate.google.no/translate?hl=no&sl=en&tl=no&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.vwnorge.no%2Findex.php%3Ftopic%3D50337.0
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Jeg har ikke for mange biler, bare for lite plass.
Hilsen Svein Terje 91647950
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« Svar #9 på: februar 23, 2020, 19:38:09 pm »

Veldig bra engasjement fra trådstarter! Tommel opp!
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Old bugs never die
Endre S
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« Svar #10 på: januar 11, 2023, 19:51:24 pm »

Oppdaterer litt her om dagen, så hvis noen har kommentarer, er det bare å komme med det :-)

I 1949 ble det solgt 2 volkswagens i USA 😳
« Siste redigering: februar 04, 2023, 23:07:35 pm av Endre S » Loggført

1974 1303 SilverBIGL
1971 1302 Cab
1963 Type 311
1967 Type 365 Squareback
X
1962 Type 343 Ghia 
1957 Type 111 (T111) 
1964 Type 311    
Type 1 are nice, Type 2 are cool, BUT Everyone knows, that  Type 3............RULE!\\\\\\\" 

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